Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Fourth National Wireless Carrier Could Result in $1B Gains: Competition Bureau

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Fourth National Wireless Carrier Could Result in $1B Gains: Competition Bureau

Article excerpt

More competition in wireless could bring big gains

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OTTAWA - Greater competition in the tightly-controlled mobile wireless market could result in savings of about $1 billion a year for consumers and the wider economy, says the Competition Bureau.

The competition watchdog made the claim in a submission Thursday to the federal regulator, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, which is reviewing whether to increase regulation in the wholesale sector and has public hearings scheduled for September.

The regulations would effect what the large wireless companies -- Rogers (TSX:RCI.B), Bell (TSX:BCE) and Telus (TSX:T) -- can charge small players for the use of towers and roaming fees.

In the submission released Thursday, the Competition Bureau said one study into the issue suggests Canadians could benefit from greater competition and that large established wireless operators are realizing above-normal returns on investments because of their market dominance.

The bureau says the three largest wireless companies, which together have about 90 per cent of Canada's cellphone market, have the power to maintain prices above competitive levels for a significant period of time.

"The bureau estimates that increased retail competition from an additional nationwide mobile wireless carrier could result in gains of approximately $1 billion per year to the Canadian economy in the form of better product choices, price reductions and other benefits to customers," it said.

The $1 billion figure comes from a previously-commissioned report from the Brattle Group, which estimated a fourth national carrier would expand mobile wireless usage in Canada and drive down incumbents' average retail prices by about two per cent.

But Rogers' senior vice-president of regulatory affairs, Ken Engelhart, dismissed the submission as "misguided" and "speculative," since the report deals with potential savings from added competition.

He noted that the federal government is about to pass legislation as part of the omnibus budget bill that would place a cap on the roaming charges the large incumbents can demand from small players and new entrants. …

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