Newspaper article China Post

Taiwan Needs to Embrace Foreign Students, Professionals

Newspaper article China Post

Taiwan Needs to Embrace Foreign Students, Professionals

Article excerpt

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Almost nine in 10 foreign students would be willing to work or recommend study in Taiwan to fellow students according to recent research by the Foundation for International Cooperation in Higher Education of Taiwan (FICHET, [...]). The survey, which collected information from a total of 1,602 participants, also suggested that only 5.88 percent of them would recommend other people to learn Mandarin in mainland China, stressing that traditional Chinese characters are better than simplified ones.

To the same extent, we also believe that more foreign students and professionals would be willing to further contribute to Taiwan's economy, if only they'd be allowed to. After all, facilitating foreigners to develop their careers here would not only stimulate the economy; it would also inspire locals to better themselves. But what ultimately would lead them to their decision of trying for the "Taiwanese dream," so to speak, is not so simple. Those foreigners would have to feel that their abilities are more valued here than abroad. That is usually not the case. It is our opinion that to attract foreign professionals to work here, for longer than a short-term contract, would require true changes in the local corporate culture, especially regarding overtime, paid holidays, retirement benefits and management of human resources.

Do you know that many people spend very long hours in offices even though they are actually doing no productive work at all, often playing with their cellphone if they can get away with it. The managers are also accused of very rarely praising good work and failing to motivate, leading the more creative employees to change jobs frequently. It is also common here to push workers paid salary to work overtime at no cost, leading to the exploitation of junior staff. Very few people also enjoy a break in summertime, a holiday that would allow them to rest, reflect and return to work invigorated and therefore become more productive. …

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