Newspaper article The Daily Yomiuri (Toyko, Japan)

Iconic Architecture Shown through Tange's Own Lens

Newspaper article The Daily Yomiuri (Toyko, Japan)

Iconic Architecture Shown through Tange's Own Lens

Article excerpt

An exhibition of about 2,250 photos of architecture and other works mainly designed by Kenzo Tange (1913-2005), a leading architect who took the photos himself, is being held at Toto Gallery Ma in the Minami-Aoyama district in Tokyo.

Most of the photos, which include images of the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum, are being shown to the public for the first time. The photos provide important clues to Tange's design intent as they show where he placed architectural emphasis.

Tange used a Leica camera regularly and sometimes used photos he took himself for architectural magazines and his photo collections. He took more than 2,300 photos over a decade from 1949. Contact sheets made from 35-millimeter negatives have been kept in albums, and Tange's eldest daughter, Michiko Uchida, 64, has taken custody of them.

In recent years, architect and architectural historian Saikaku Toyokawa, an associate professor at Oyama National College of Technology, and others have conducted research on Tange's photos and decided to show them to the public in honor of the 10th anniversary of his death.

A majority of the photos depict his early representative works -- including the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum, which was Tange's debut work, the former Tokyo Metropolitan government building and the Kagawa prefectural government building -- when they were under construction or when they were completed. …

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