Newspaper article The Canadian Press

B.C. Premier, Vancouver Mayor Outline Local Priorities for Trudeau Government

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

B.C. Premier, Vancouver Mayor Outline Local Priorities for Trudeau Government

Article excerpt

B.C. politicians detail wish list for Trudeau

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VANCOUVER - The wish list for Justin Trudeau's new government has grown as B.C. Premier Christy Clark pushes for action on climate change and softwood lumber, while mayors put their hands out for much-needed infrastructure money.

Clark joined politicians Tuesday as they made bids for attention to their issues one day after Stephen Harper's Conservatives were ousted from a decade-long grip on power.

Clark said the federal government's "wisest" move on climate would be following the lead already set by the provinces -- in particular, B.C.'s carbon-pricing policies.

The federal government should simply be taking the role of co-ordinator and not "start to fiddle with real success that we've seen," she told reporters.

Clark has long had her flight booked for the upcoming United Nations climate change summit in Paris next month, she said, adding it will be Trudeau who must ultimately represent all the provincial leaders on the international stage.

British Columbia's premier also said Trudeau must jump-start renegotiation of the softwood lumber agreement with the United States, which hasn't been responsive to restarting talks.

Although the deal made in 2006 expired last week, it remains in effect for another year and precludes the U.S. from bringing trade action against Canadian softwood lumber producers.

"It is absolutely urgent," Clark said. "My approach? What do we all do when you make a phone call and you can't get through the first time? You keep calling."

While Trudeau has said he plans to run deficit budgets to rebuild Canada's infrastructure, B.C. Finance Minister Mike de Jong said he expects the province to keep a tight rein on spending as it continues to produce balanced budgets.

"We have been very clear from the outset what our approach to fiscal management is," he said.

Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson was buoyant as he hailed the election results as a "resounding win" for Canada's big cities.

"The cities need to be treated as constructive partners and we're eager to reset that relationship," he said. "Frankly, the past decade has been a lost opportunity for cities with the Conservative government. …

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