Newspaper article The Canadian Press

What's Making News in the Prairies

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

What's Making News in the Prairies

Article excerpt

What's making news in the Prairies

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FOCUS ON TECHNOLOGY, NOT TAX:SASKATCHEWAN PREMIER

Saskatchewan's premier says it would be better to invest in technology that reduces emissions than to bring in a carbon tax at a time when the energy sector in Canada is struggling.

Brad Wall was reacting to a Globe and Mail report that the federal government is eyeing a national carbon tax of $15 a tonne.

He says the focus should be on technology, and points to a carbon capture and sequestration project at a coal-fired power plant in southern Saskatchewan.

The Saskatchewan government has talked in the past about a possible carbon levy for heavy emitters with the money going back into a technology fund to help find ways to reduce emissions.

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PSYCHOLOGIST SAYS ACCUSED KILLER SHOWS SIGNS OF PARANOID PSYCHOSIS

The trial of an Edmonton man accused of killing his girlfriend has heard from a psychologist who says 29-year-old Mark Lindsay shows signs of paranoid psychosis.

Marc Nesca told a Red Deer court on Friday that Lindsay did not develop normally as a child, showed bizarre behaviour and attachment issues and began abusing substances around age 10.

Lindsay is charged with second-degree murder, offering an indignity to a body and obstruction in the 2011 death of 31-year-old Dana Turner.

Court has heard that Lindsay, who's the son of a former Edmonton police chief, claims he killed Turner because he feared she was part of a group of serial killers trying to get him.

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CFIA RECALLS SOME CANTELOUPES SOLD IN ALBERTA, MANITOBA DUE TO POSSIBLE CONTAMINATION

Some cantaloupes sold in Alberta and Manitoba are being recalled due to possible salmonella contamination.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency says Freshpoint Vancouver is recalling the Del Monte and Sysco Imperial Fresh-brand cantaloupes, which were also sold in B.C. and possibly across the country.

There have been no reported illnesses linked to the fruit but people should either throw it out or take it back to the store where they bought it.

Salmonella bacteria can cause serious and possibly deadly infections in young children, pregnant women, the elderly and people with weakened immune systems. …

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