Newspaper article The Canadian Press

British Columbia Man's Underwear Gag for His Wife Leads to Modelling Gig

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

British Columbia Man's Underwear Gag for His Wife Leads to Modelling Gig

Article excerpt

B.C. man's underwear gag leads to modelling gig

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LANGFORD, B.C. - Brendon Williams freely admits his paunchy belly and bushy-black chest don't qualify him as typical chiselled male-model material.

But the man from Langford, B.C., has gained international exposure after a daring series of boudoir birthday poses landed him a starring role in an anti-image advertising campaign with American Eagle.

It started as a husband's private birthday gag for his wife Amanda, and resulted in him playing a feature role in an advertising campaign supporting underwear for regular people, Williams says.

It has also been a huge confidence boost for the 29-year-old father, who says he hasn't always had the strongest body image but is completely comfortable lounging at home in his briefs.

"This has actually improved my self esteem," says Williams in a bedroom interview at his suburban Victoria home, wearing only his underpants. "Not so much that I think I look better on the whole, but I think it's more that I don't have to be concerned about my flaws as much. I don't think I have the greatest body in the world, obviously, but this has made me go a little bit easier on myself."

The would-be professional golfer who earns a living playing online poker says he flew to Los Angeles last month for a photo shoot with the U.S.-based clothing chain for the launch of its (fictitious) Aerie line of comfortable underwear for men.

Williams, who says he's a practical joker and not an actor, played a character named Doug in the ad, which runs almost two minutes.

"Oh yeah, I've always liked being in my underwear," Williams says in the ad while sitting on a couch in nothing but underwear. "It makes me feel more free."

While the line of underwear was a hoax, the brand says the ad's message is all too real -- that men should accept their bodies as they are.

Williams knew from the beginning the ad was a gag but it was clear to him American Eagle was sincere about the faux campaign's body-positive message, he says.

There are three other underwear-clad men and a woman in the ad. Each character talks about being comfortable with themselves while doing house and yard chores. …

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