Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Eight Stories in the News Today, June 16

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Eight Stories in the News Today, June 16

Article excerpt

Eight stories in the news today, June 16

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Eight stories in the news today from The Canadian Press:

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SENATE PASSES C-14 WITH AMENDMENTS

The Senate has sent the federal government's controversial bill on assisted dying back to the House of Commons with a major amendment that guts the central premise of the proposed law: that only those who are near death should qualify for medical help to end their lives. The bill, as amended over the past two weeks of lengthy debate in the upper house, passed late Wednesday by a vote of 64-12 with one abstention.

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PROTEST PLANNED IN SUPPORT OF NORWEGIAN VETERAN

Former military members are planning a protest today in Halifax over the federal government's treatment of a 94-year-old Norwegian veteran. The group Banished Veterans organized the event after Petter Blindheim was denied entry into a federally-funded hospital. Ottawa rejected Blindheim's request for a bed at the Halifax site because it says he could receive adequate care at existing provincial facilities.

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PM TRUDEAU TO MAKE TRANSIT ANNOUNCEMENT

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is expected to make a major transit funding announcement today in Metro Vancouver. He is scheduled to meet Premier Christy Clark in Burnaby, B.C., and make an announcement at the SkyTrain operations centre. The Liberal government has already committed to provide $370 million for transit improvements in Metro Vancouver.

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TORIES QUESTION RUSH TO CPP CHANGES

The Opposition Conservatives are questioning the Liberal government's rush to expand the Canada Pension Plan that could give Canadians more in retirement by taking more off their paycheques today. Finance critic Lisa Raitt says the government hasn't provided the evidence to show that there would be widespread benefits from the proposals federal and provincial finance ministers are now poring over.

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RETIREE SPENDING DROPS OFF AFTER AGE 70: STUDY

A new study says automatically raising workplace pension contributions in tandem with the cost of living is unnecessary because Canadian retirees increasingly tighten their purse strings after they reach 70 years old. …

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