Newspaper article The Canadian Press

What's Making News in British Columbia

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

What's Making News in British Columbia

Article excerpt

What's making news in British Columbia

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TERSE WORDS LAUNCH ANNUAL GATHERING OF B.C. POLITICIANS, FIRST NATIONS

Grand Chief Stewart Phillip didn't hide his frustration as he delivered opening remarks at the annual gathering of aboriginal leaders and B.C. cabinet ministers.

In a speech immediately following comments from B.C.'s Aboriginal Relations Minister John Rustad, Phillip shredded Rustad's remarks about progress on First Nations issues, and creation of bus service along the so-called "Highway of Tears."

Phillip said if it takes that many words to describe how well a relationship is working, then it's not working at all.

He hammered the B-C Liberal government for ignoring First Nations opposition and proceeding with the Site C dam, saying the government has not been responsive to aboriginal concerns since former premier Gordon Campbell was in power.

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COMPLICATED INVESTIGATION SEEKS INFORMATION ABOUT THREE PEOPLE MISSING NEAR WILLIAMS LAKE, B.C.

Mounties in Williams Lake say the disappearance of three people is believed to be connected.

Forty-four-year-old Mihai Vornicu and his 58-year-old wife Marie Olarte were reported missing in early August and RCMP in the Cariboo issued an appeal for public assistance on Sept. 1.

That's when the family of 32-year-old Robert Dragoescu reported they had not heard from him since late July, at about the same time as the vehicle belonging to the missing couple was found abandoned in Williams Lake.

Investigators said the three knew each other and had been seen together in Greater Vancouver before they vanished and anyone with information is urged to contact Williams Lake RCMP or Crime Stoppers.

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COMPUTER PROBLEMS STALL FIRST DEGREE MURDER TRIAL IN NANAIMO

Opening statements were just about to get underway Wednesday morning in Nanaimo at the first-degree murder trial of Kevin Addison, but the case almost immediately hit a snag.

The trial, which is expected to run for at least four weeks, was delayed because of problems with the recording equipment in the courtroom.

The issues occurred after Addison and the six-man, six-woman jury had been seated, but Addison was removed and officials were uncertain about when the trial would resume. …

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