Newspaper article The Canadian Press

What's Making News in the Prairies

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

What's Making News in the Prairies

Article excerpt

What's making news in the Prairies

--

---

NO CLIMATE SUPPORT WITHOUT A PIPELINE: NOTLEY

Alberta Premier Rachel Notley has responded to Ottawa's new climate change plan with an ultimatum, saying Canada must have Alberta's back as it deals with an oil-price crash.

The new federal plan calls for a $10 per tonne price on carbon starting in 2018.

But Notley says she will not support what she calls an "ambitious public policy move" unless Ottawa makes progress on getting new oil pipelines to Canada's coasts.

Opposition Wildrose Leader Brian Jean criticized Notley's quid pro quo, saying Alberta's economic interests should not be held hostage by politicians in Ottawa.

---

WALL SAYS FEDERAL CARBON TAX WILL HURT

Saskatchewan's premier says the federal government's new carbon pricing plan will do little to reduce emissions and will likely harm the country's economy.

Brad Wall says the plan to unilaterally impose a price on carbon across the country shows a "stunning" level of disrespect.

He says Saskatchewan will be among the provinces hardest hit by the new federal carbon tax, at a time when its economy is already facing a downturn in commodity prices.

Wall says the province estimates the new tax will cost the average family $1,250 a year.

---

MANITOBA RULES OUT CAP AND TRADE ON EMISSIONS

Manitoba's premier says a one-size-fits-all approach will not work when dealing with the provinces and how they each handle carbon emissions and the environment.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has given the provinces until 2018 to either institute a cap-and-trade approach or set a carbon price of at least $10 a tonne.

But Premier Brian Pallister says his province has already moved toward cleaner energy with its hydro developments and other projects, and is not a major source of emissions.

He says he's not interested in a cap-and-trade system like the ones Ontario and Quebec are working on, but he's not ruling out a possible carbon tax. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.