Newspaper article The Canadian Press

The Monday News Briefing: An At-a-Glance Survey of Some Top Stories

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

The Monday News Briefing: An At-a-Glance Survey of Some Top Stories

Article excerpt

The Monday briefing: Top news at-a-glance

--

Highlights from the news file for Monday, Oct. 31

OTTAWA UNVEILS IMMIGRATION TARGETS: Canada won't increase the number of new immigrants being welcomed to the country next year, but is laying the foundation for a bigger boost in levels in the coming years. Numbers tabled Monday in the House of Commons show Canada will bring in 300,000 new arrivals next year -- the same number that was established this year on a temporary basis to accommodate an influx of Syrian refugees. Immigration Minister John McCallum says the 300,000 number will now become the foundational figure for future growth in immigration targets.

------

VADER VERDICT REDUCED TO MANSLAUGHTER: An Edmonton judge has changed his murder verdict to manslaughter in the case of Travis Vader and the two missing seniors he was convicted of killing. Justice Denny Thomas used an outdated section of the Criminal Code in his original second-degree murder verdict, and lawyers returned to court Monday to argue whether there should be a mistrial. Thomas set aside two weeks beginning Dec. 12 for a sentencing hearing. Vader was convicted last month in the deaths of Lyle and Marie McCann.

------

POLICE MONITORED MONTREAL JOURNALIST: A journalist for Montreal's La Presse newspaper was furious to learn city police had been monitoring his iPhone for months in order to find out who he was speaking with. Patrick Lagace says he learned through his employer that at least 24 surveillance warrants were issued for his phone this year as part of an internal probe into allegations that anti-gang investigators fabricated evidence. Lagace says La Presse is challenging the warrants in court.

------

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT TO ISSUE ECONOMIC STATEMENT: The federal government will update the country on its economic and fiscal path Tuesday in a statement that Ottawa hopes will also encourage Canadians to focus on the potential of its long-term plan -- rather than dwelling on the short-term pain. The Liberals won last year's election on a platform promising to help lift the slow-growth economy with billions worth of deficit spending. It remains to be seen Tuesday whether Ottawa's trajectory will push the books even deeper into the red, as some of Canada's big banks have predicted.

------

PAYROLL PROBLEMS MAY BE CLEARED BY END OF YEAR: The deadline for clearing the backlog of payroll problems has passed, and the federal government is now looking to get the problem sorted out by the end of the year. Marie Lemay, deputy minister of Public Services and Procurement Canada, says there are still about 22,000 cases to be dealt with. The Phoenix payroll system left thousands of public servants with problems -- some were underpaid, some were paid too much, while others weren't paid at all. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.