Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

Glasnow's Dichotomy Troubling Young Pitcher Wrestling with Present, Future While Trying to Learn to Move On

Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

Glasnow's Dichotomy Troubling Young Pitcher Wrestling with Present, Future While Trying to Learn to Move On

Article excerpt

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. - The starting pitchers born two decades apart stood in contrast. On the mound first at Champion Stadium Monday was Atlanta Braves veteran right-hander Bartolo Colon, the beloved 44-year-old baseball cult hero whose measurements run 5 feet 11 and 285 pounds. His counterpart was the Pirates' Tyler Glasnow, a rookie, who is 6-8, 220 pounds and 23.

Two very different men achieved a very similar result. They allowed five earned runs apiece, and neither pitched past the third inning. They hit the showers with the score tied, 5-5. In the clubhouse, Glasnow stewed, struggling to shake the bad start; Colon simply shrugged.

The difference, of course, is after 19 seasons in the majors, Colon has the ability - and the roster security - to shrug off an ugly outing in mid-March. To an old man, it's just spring training.

"I think after I get one more start, I'll be where I want to be," Colon told reporters.

Learning to forget and not slow down is near the top of Glasnow's checklist this spring. It wasn't difficult after he struck out six over two innings in his first Grapefruit League appearance Feb. 26, but after the three since - 12 earned runs over 6? innings - replays have been abundant.

"I'm so much better than how I've pitched the last three times," Glasnow said Monday. "[Moving on] is all I can do, really. . The last couple I've really been able to let them go a lot better than I was able to before. I'm just going to treat this one the same. Looking back on it, thinking about it and dwelling on it doesn't do me any good. This is good practice, I guess.

"If there's anything I can take from this, it's to learn how to move on."

For Glasnow, Monday showed both his progress and his problems.

The first roster cuts were made in the morning, removing from major league camp six prospects who had no chance of making the opening-day roster. Glasnow was among the first cuts a year ago, along with right-hander Jameson Taillon, and though the cuts were expected, they fumed. They told general manager Neal Huntington their goal was to never be in another send-down meeting.

So there's progress.

"I wasn't first cuts this year," Glasnow said. …

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