Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Commons Committee Calls for Rollback of Key C-51 Anti-Terror Measures

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Commons Committee Calls for Rollback of Key C-51 Anti-Terror Measures

Article excerpt

MPs call for rollback of anti-terror measures

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OTTAWA - A House of Commons committee is calling for repeal of a provision that allows Canada's spy agency to violate constitutional rights, with a judge's permission, in the name of disrupting national security threats.

In a report Tuesday, the Liberal-dominated public safety committee also recommended requiring a judge's approval for any Canadian Security Intelligence Service disruption operations that fall short of breaching constitutional guarantees, but nevertheless break the law.

Currently, CSIS efforts to derail plots could involve taking down an extremist's website, cancelling airline tickets, disabling a vehicle -- or even more drastic actions.

In addition, the MPs said the scope of activities subject to recently enacted information-sharing powers should be narrowed to make them consistent with other national security legislation.

Many of the 41 recommendations put flesh on the bones of Liberal promises to fix "problematic elements" of Conservative anti-terrorism legislation known as C-51.

Conservative MPs on the committee issued a dissenting report saying the legislation should be maintained, while New Democrats tabled a supplementary opinion suggesting the government should go further by scrapping C-51.

"Close to two years after being elected, the Liberals still haven't adopted legislative measures to repeal C-51, the dangerous and ineffective law adopted rashly by the former Conservative government," said Matthew Dube, the NDP public safety critic.

Green Party Leader Elizabeth May warned the Liberals would be building on a "deeply flawed foundation" unless they repeal much of the previous government's legislation.

Conservative public safety critic Tony Clement steadfastly disagreed, saying the Liberals "chose to focus on ways to handcuff our security services and take away necessary powers."

The majority report maintains there need be no tradeoff between national security and the rights of Canadians, committee chairman Rob Oliphant told a news conference.

"They both may be fully realized, and in fact can only be fully realized, if they're both fully respected. …

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