Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Ever Wanted to Live in 2 Nations at Once? Here's Your Chance

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Ever Wanted to Live in 2 Nations at Once? Here's Your Chance

Article excerpt

BEEBE PLAIN, Vt. * For sale: A 1782 fixer-upper with thick granite walls, 1950s decor, and armed 24-hour security provided by both Canada and the United States of America.

The almost 7,000- square-foot house, cut into five currently vacant apartments, is on a lot of less than a quarter-acre that, along with the building itself, straddles the border between Beebe Plain, Vt., and Stanstead, Quebec.

Selling a home in two countries is proving to be a challenge for the couple who owns it. The structure, which has an estimated rebuild cost of about $600,000, is on the market for $109,000. It's structurally sound but needs lots of work. And then there's that international border.

"In the day, it was a normal and natural thing," Brian DuMoulin, who grew up in the house and was accustomed to life literally on the border at a time when no one thought twice about crossing from one country to the other. "Now it stresses everyone out."

The home, known locally as the Old Stone Store, was built by a merchant so he could sell to farmers in both Vermont and Quebec. Brian and his wife, Joan DuMoulin, inherited it about 40 years ago. Now the couple, in their 70s, who have dual U.S. and Canadian citizenship and a home in nearby Morgan, Vt., are hoping to sell it and move to Ontario to be closer to their children and grandchildren.

Beebe Plain is an area in the Vermont town of Derby, which along with Stanstead, about 60 miles northeast of Montpelier, or 75 miles southeast of Montreal, have become the clich of security changes on the U.S.-Canadian border brought on by the 9/11 attacks on the United States.

Residential streets that used to be open were blocked by gates. The back doors of an apartment building straddling the border in Derby Line village have been locked shut. The street next to the Haskell Free Library and Opera House, deliberately built in both countries, is blocked by flower pots, although Canadians are still allowed to walk to the library's U.S. entrance without going through a border post.

The DuMoulins' house is directly across Stanstead's Rue Principale from the port of entry staffed by agents of the Canada Border Services Agency and adjacent to a U. …

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