Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Some Grade 9 Students to Negotiate End-of-Term Grades in New Pilot Project

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Some Grade 9 Students to Negotiate End-of-Term Grades in New Pilot Project

Article excerpt

Students to negotiate grades in pilot project

--

CALEDON, Ont. - A new pilot project at a high school in Ontario will see Grade 9 students negotiating their end-of-semester grades with their teacher, an idea some experts say will help keep the focus on learning.

The students, enrolled in four courses at Mayfield Secondary School in Caledon, Ont., will receive feedback from their teacher throughout the semester, but not grades. At the end of the term, they'll sit down with the teacher and evaluate their course work and will, ideally, come to an agreement on an appropriate final grade.

"It'll be a negotiation process where they have a conversation about the learning, and the student can articulate exactly what they've learned and how they've grown as a learner," said school principal James Kardash. "And when we can get to that, we're starting to make inroads on what education should really be about."

Experts have had mixed reactions to the idea.

Colleen Willard-Holt, dean of the faculty of education at Wilfrid Laurier University, thinks grades carry a lot of weight, and sometimes they're overrated.

"It can work quite well for students to engage in a dialogue with their teacher and talk about what they have learned and what kinds of things they can show that demonstrate their learning," she said in an interview.

"That dialogue then, is another chance for them to engage in the learning process itself, because they're learning to advocate for themselves, they're learning to articulate the learning that has taken place within themselves."

Carol Rolheiser, director at the Centre for Teaching Support and Innovation at the University of Toronto, says that when students receive consistent feedback from teachers and peers throughout the school year, they tend to perform better.

"Saying, 'Based on that feedback, what do I need to do differently in the future? …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.