Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Six Stories in the News for Today, Oct. 10

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Six Stories in the News for Today, Oct. 10

Article excerpt

Six stories in the news for today, Oct. 10

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Six stories in the news for Tuesday, Oct. 10

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TRUDEAU, HARPER TO CROSS PATHS IN WASHINGTON

The current prime minister and his predecessor will both be in Washington this week for the same reason -- the renegotiation of NAFTA. Stephen Harper is scheduled to attend a panel discussion on trade Wednesday afternoon, just as Trudeau is a few blocks away at the White House, discussing trade with President Donald Trump. The fourth round of NAFTA talks in Washington are expected see a ratcheting up in intensity as countries begin to broach more difficult issues.

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IS TRUMP TRYING TO KILL NAFTA?

Call it the art of the non-deal. As the fourth round of NAFTA talks begins this week near Washington, a consensus is growing that a series of untenable U.S. bargaining positions is part of simple plan by U.S. President Donald Trump to eventually walk away from the trade pact to please his domestic base. Some cite a Buy American proposal presented in the third round of talks in Ottawa two weeks ago. But the U.S. might wade into another contentious area in this round: its desire for more access to Canada's protected and supply managed dairy industry.

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POLL: MANY DON'T WANT 'CANADA FIRST' APPROACH

A new survey suggests Canadians don't want this country going down the same path as the U.S. The Ekos-Canadian Press survey asked Canadians whether they'd like to see Canada become more or less like the U.S., or for things to remain as they are. Fifty-two per cent said they'd like this country to be less like the U.S., and 60 per cent of those surveyed don't want a "Canada First" policy similar to U.S. President Donald Trump's "America First" approach. The survey was conducted between Sept. 15 and Oct. 1.

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N.S. HOSPITAL REWRITES RULES AFTER DEATH

A Nova Scotia hospital has rewritten waiting time rules and end-of-life protocols in response to the disturbing story of how a 68-year-old man dying from pancreatic cancer languished for six hours in an ER hallway. A report on the death of Jack Webb says that as of July 1, the Halifax Infirmary requires internal medicine specialists to meet their patients within two hours when transferred to the hospital after being seen by another facility. …

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