Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Growing Marijuana Industry Sparks New Research around Cannabis, Scientists Say

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Growing Marijuana Industry Sparks New Research around Cannabis, Scientists Say

Article excerpt

Marijuana industry spurs new research

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The budding marijuana industry is spurring new research around cannabis that will have long-term effects on a variety of fields, from farming to new medicine, as companies look for solid scientific data on the substance.

With the looming legalization of recreational pot next summer, and the expansion of licensed medical marijuana producers, scientists at the University of Guelph say more organizations are turning to researchers for help growing better plants.

The Ontario university has a long horticultural research history and some of its staff and students are already deep into the study of medicinal marijuana.

On Friday, a team of two environmental science professors and a graduate student published a research paper -- one they called the first of its kind and the first of many to come -- about optimizing the growth of medicinal cannabis indoors.

The study looked at the rate of organic fertilizer in soilless products holding cannabis before it flowered and the optimization of tetrahydrocannabinol -- the primary psychoactive part of cannabis -- and cannabidiol, which has been touted as a potential treatment for certain forms of epilepsy.

"There is hardly any scientific information on how to produce these plants and now there is so much interest in this area," said Youbin Zheng, who led the study funded by a licensed medical marijuana producer as well the federal government.

Words such as "OG kush" and "grizzly" -- types of marijuana strains -- have now appeared in a scientific journal, this time in HortScience, and there's more to come.

Zheng and fellow professor Mike Dixon have a series of studies in the pipeline that examine the effects of irrigation, lighting, fertilization and soilless technology on cannabis growth as they try to bring scientific rigour to marijuana research.

Dixon is blunt when reflecting on the current cannabis research landscape.

"Much of the work now is largely based on anecdotal bullshit from people who think they have it all figured out and did all their research in their basements," he said.

The idea now, he notes, is to take the medicinal marijuana world from the backwoods to pharmaceutical-grade production. …

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