Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Prep-LifeWatch

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Prep-LifeWatch

Article excerpt

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(Lung-Cancer-Report)

Canadian researchers have developed a model to predict lung cancer in early stages when the disease has a greater potential to be curable.

The Pan Can Model, developed by health researchers across the country, looked at more than 25-hundred current and former smokers between the ages of 50 and 75 in eight cities who has a minimum two per cent risk of developing lung cancer within six years.

They were tested with a low-dose C-T scan at the onset of the study, and then at the one- and four-year mark.

The screenings resulted in 6.5 per cent of the participants being diagnosed with lung cancer -- a higher rate than the four per cent of cases caught through the U-S model using different parameters.

Seventy-seven per cent of the Canadian diagnosed were also caught in very early stages, compared with 57 per cent of cases in the U.S. trial.

The study -- funded by the Terry Fox Research Institute and Canadian Partnership Against Cancer -- is published in the journal The Lancet Oncology. (The Canadian Press)

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(Google-Maps-Calories)

A mental health advocate is pleased with a move by Google to shut down a calorie count feature in its map application.

Critics say it could be damaging to users with eating disorders.

Google's experiment with presenting a calorie-burn estimate alongside walking directions drew widespread criticism on social media and was disabled on Monday night due to strong user feedback.

The experimental feature expressed calorie estimates in the form of mini cupcakes, with one mini cupcake listed as equalling 110 calories.

Critics on social media complained the use of cupcakes seemed specifically targeted to women.

Mark Henick, national director of strategic initiatives at the Canadian Mental Health Association, says one of the biggest problems with the feature was that it couldn't be turned off. (The Canadian Press)

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(FBO-NB-Football Concussions)

A New Brunswick high school football coach's decision to forfeit a game at halftime because of head injuries among his players is highlighting how sports teams handle concussions.

Coach Marcel Metti of the L'Odyssee Olympiens halted a game last Friday against the Tantramar Titans with his team trailing 35-0. …

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