Newspaper article The Canadian Press

'Boom - This Thing Just Went Off:' Saskatchewan Farmer Describes Fatal Shooting

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

'Boom - This Thing Just Went Off:' Saskatchewan Farmer Describes Fatal Shooting

Article excerpt

Saskatchewan farmer tells murder trial gun 'went off'

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BATTLEFORD, Sask. - A Saskatchewan farmer on trial for the shooting of an Indigenous man says he was filled with terror in the moments before his gun "just went off."

Gerald Stanley told the jury in his second-degree murder trial Monday that he and his son heard an SUV with a flat tire drive into his farmyard near Biggar, Sask., in August 2016. He said they heard one of their all-terrain vehicles start and thought it was being stolen.

Stanley testified they ran toward the SUV. He kicked the tail light and his son Sheldon hit the windshield with a hammer.

Stanley said he grabbed a handgun, normally used to scare off wildlife, when the SUV didn't leave the yard, and fired two or three shots into the air.

"I thought I'm going to make some noise and hopefully they're going to run out of the yard," he told court. "I just raised the gun in the air and fired straight up."

Stanley said he popped out the cartridge "to make sure it was disarmed."

"As far as I was concerned, it was empty and I had fired my last shot."

He testified he went up to the SUV because he worried it had run over his wife and he tried to reach for the keys in the ignition.

"I was reaching in and across the steering wheel to turn the key off and -- boom -- this thing just went off," Stanley testified.

"Was your finger on the trigger?" his lawyer, Scott Spencer, asked.

"No," Stanley answered.

"Did you intend to hurt anyone?" Spencer asked.

"No. I just wanted them to leave," Stanley said. "I couldn't believe what just happened and everything seemed to just go silent. I just backed away."

Colten Boushie, who was 22, was sitting in the driver's seat of the grey Ford Escape when he was shot in the back of the head.

Court has heard an SUV carrying Boushie, and five other people from the Red Pheasant First Nation, had a flat tire and drove onto the Stanley farm. The driver testified the group had been drinking during the day and tried to break into a truck on a neighbouring farm, but went to the Stanley property in search of help with the tire.

Spencer told the jury in his opening statement earlier Monday that Boushie was the victim of "a freak accident that occurred in the course of an unimaginably scary situation. …

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