Newspaper article The Canadian Press

In the News Today, Feb. 7

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

In the News Today, Feb. 7

Article excerpt

In the news today, Feb. 7

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Seven stories in the news for Wednesday, Feb. 7

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ALBERTA TO STOP IMPORTING B.C. WINE IN OIL FLAP

Alberta Premier Rachel Notley says her province is banning wine from British Columbia wineries effective immediately. This, after B-C said last week that it plans to limit how much diluted bitumen can be shipped from the coast. Notley says B.C.'s wine industry sent about 17 million bottles to Alberta last year worth about $70 million. B.C. Premier John Horgan says if Alberta has a problem with the proposed pipeline regulations, they should take the matter to court, not hit back at B.C. businesses.

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ONTARIO PLANS TO CONFRONT 'BUY AMERICAN' PROVISIONS

Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne says her government will soon introduce a bill to retaliate against any state that adopts Buy American provisions. Wynne says each punishment will be proportional to the size of the Buy American exclusion because she doesn't want to start a trade war. The premier says she also plans to discuss the move with fellow premiers at an upcoming conference.

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FEDS EARMARK CASH FOR ONLINE CHILD PROTECTION

The Liberal government will spend millions in new money for a national centre to protect children from online sexual exploitation. The Canadian Centre for Child Protection will receive $4.1 million over five years, and $857,000 a year ongoing. The registered charity says victims of childhood sexual abuse often suffer great distress over the fact video or pictures of the crimes are circulating in cyberspace -- adding to the pain they already experience.

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RESEARCHERS HOPE FOR EUREKA MOMENT IN FEDERAL BUDGET

The federal budget, now believed to be only a few weeks away, is expected to contain a major financial lift for basic scientific research across the country. The spending will address some concerns laid out last year in a review of fundamental science which recommended the government end a long stretch of underfunding with phased-in investments over four years.

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ALBERTA STILL NATURAL, BUT SHRINKING FAST

Alberta's natural beauty is still largely intact but parts of it are disappearing faster than the Amazon rain forest. …

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