Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Lack of Racial Diversity in Medical Textbooks Could Mean Inequity in Care: Study

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Lack of Racial Diversity in Medical Textbooks Could Mean Inequity in Care: Study

Article excerpt

Racial diversity needed in medical books: study

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VANCOUVER - Sitting in a doctor's waiting room in Vancouver, Patricia Louie saw posters that only featured white and light skin-toned people depicted as patients. She wondered if medical textbooks would also reflect what she considered to be a biased portrayal of Canada's diverse population.

The experience in 2012 led the sociology student who was studying at the University of British Columbia at the time to analyze faces in four textbooks widely used in North American medical schools. She concluded in an honours thesis that racial diversity was being ignored.

Most images in medical books are of legs, arms and chests, showing only skin tone, not race, so Louie broadened her research as a master's student at the University of Toronto and focused on skin tone in over 4,000 images in later versions of the same textbooks.

The study by Louie and co-author Rima Wilkes, a sociology professor at the University of British Columbia, found the proportion of dark skin tones represented was very small in images featured in "Atlas of Human Anatomy," "Bates' Guide to Physical Examinations and History Taking," "Clinically Oriented Anatomy" and "Gray's Anatomy for Students."

"Atlas" had fewer than one per cent of photos featuring dark skin, while the highest amount -- five per cent -- was included in "Gray's," the researchers say in the study, published in the journal Social Science and Medicine.

Imagery of six common cancers for people of colour or dark skin tone hardly exist in the textbooks, says the study, which suggests unequal health care could result.

"Although we can't make any causal statements, I think it's fair to say that the material in textbooks may influence how doctors think about who a patient is and that the under-representation of dark skin-toned people may contribute to inequities in treatment," said Louis, who is of Caucasian and Asian heritage.

She said mortality rates for some cancers, including breast, cervical, lung, colon and skin, are higher on average for black people, who are often diagnosed at later stages of the disease.

The study draws on research that says 52 per cent of black people receive an initial diagnosis of an advanced stage of skin cancer compared with 16 per cent of white people. …

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