Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Nation Briefs: Oklahoma to Use Gas for Executions

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Nation Briefs: Oklahoma to Use Gas for Executions

Article excerpt

Oklahoma to use gas for executions

Oklahoma officials say they plan to use nitrogen gas to execute inmates once the state resumes using the death penalty, marking the first time a U.S. state would use the gas to carry out capital punishment.

State Attorney General Mike Hunter and Corrections Director Joe Allbaugh made the announcement Wednesday.

Oklahoma and other states haven't been able to get the drugs required for lethal injections amid opposition from drugmakers to having their products used in executions.

Oklahoma has had one of the busiest death chambers in the U.S., but it hasn't carried out an execution since 2015 after a series of mishaps, including a botched lethal injection in 2014 that left an inmate writhing on the gurney.

Fox News sued, accused of politicizing slaying * The parents of a Democratic National Committee employee who was killed in 2016 allege Fox News exploited the slaying of their son as a "political football."

Joel and Mary Rich claim in a lawsuit that Fox News, a reporter and a guest commentator used "lies, misrepresentations and half-truths" in a May 16, 2017, article that claimed their son, Seth Rich, had leaked DNC emails to WikiLeaks during the presidential campaign.

The network removed the story a week after it was posted, saying it was not initially subjected to its "high degree of editorial scrutiny."

Rich, 27, was killed in what Washington police believe was a random robbery attempt.

YouTube cracking down on conspiracy videos * Conspiracy videos abound on YouTube, whether it's about the Earth being flat or school shootings being staged. YouTube, its parent Google, Facebook and Twitter are all facing challenges with the spread of misinformation, propaganda and fake news.

YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki said at a conference on Tuesday that the company would work to debunk videos espousing conspiracy theories by including links to the online encyclopedia Wikipedia. YouTube said in a statement Wednesday that the links would include other "third-party sources." But it isn't identifying any.

The company says move is part of a broader initiative at YouTube to crack down on misinformation, but did not give details on what else is in the works. …

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