Newspaper article The Canadian Press

--Ontario Update-

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

--Ontario Update-

Article excerpt

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(Trudeau-Steel)

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says there is no national security argument to be made against Canada when it comes to U-S tariffs on steel and aluminum imports.

Trudeau told Hamilton T-V station CHCH this morning that the argument makes no sense because Canadian steel and aluminium is in American tanks, ships and planes.

U-S President Donald Trump used the national security rational to impose steep tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from most countries -- although Canada and Mexico got a temporary exemption that may be linked to NAFTA renegotiations.

Trudeau is on a cross-country visit to steel making operations this week -- including Stelco in Hamilton today -- and says he will keep up the pressure on Trump during negotiations on both the tariffs and the North American Free Trade Agreement. (The Canadian Press)

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(Ont-Opposition)

Christine Elliott says she has no regrets following her third failed bid for the Ontario Progressive leadership.

Elliot tells Toronto T-V station C-P-24 that she's feeling a "whirlwind of emotions" following her narrow loss to Doug Ford last weekend but she entered the race to help the party and still intends to run in the June 7th provincial election.

She also says she remains friends with Ford despite initially challenging the delayed results of the vote and still feels comfortable in expressing her opinions on policy with the new leader.

Elliot says that includes her belief that the new sex-ed curriculum should be modified instead of being repealed but she says at the end of the day it's up for Ford to decide. (CP24)

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(Timmins-Racism)

A fact-finding mission by Ontario's chief human rights commissioner has found systemic racism and discrimination against Indigenous people in Timmins.

Renu Mandhane visited the area last week and found First Nations people were called "dirty Indians," told to go back to their reserves, were unduly scrutinized in stores or at the mall and discriminated against when it came to getting housing.

Mandhane says she was struck by the absence of the kind of formal or informal channels that exist in other places for discussing and addressing issues around racism and says the human rights commission is looking at whether it can broker a formal dialogue between Indigenous and civic leaders. …

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