Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Illicit Gun Sales Made to Canadians through Dark Web, Mounties Warn

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Illicit Gun Sales Made to Canadians through Dark Web, Mounties Warn

Article excerpt

Dark web triggers illicit gun sales: RCMP

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OTTAWA - Criminals are using the darker corners of the internet, hard-to-track digital currency and creative shipping techniques to sell illicit guns to Canadians, the RCMP warns.

The message comes as thousands of young people across North America demand an end to gun violence, and the Trudeau government moves to tighten laws on the licensing, sale and tracing of firearms.

The emergence of the darknet -- the hidden depths of the internet accessible only through tailored software -- is posing new challenges for authorities trying to tackle gun trafficking, said Rob O'Reilly, interim director of firearms regulatory services at the RCMP.

While police have shut down rogue online markets like Silk Road in recent years, others quickly pop up in the deepest realms of cyberspace, O'Reilly recently told a national symposium on gangs and guns.

He pointed to the Berlusconi online market, which at last count had 234 listings for weapons including AR-15 rifles, AK-47s, various handguns and countless rounds of ammunition.

The firearms are sold alongside opioids, heroin, cocaine, malware, stolen data, fraud tools, ransomware, pilfered credit cards and even depleted uranium, radioactive Polonium-210 and deadly poisons like ricin.

O'Reilly displayed a photo of an AR-15 magazine and ammunition shipped from a vendor in Montana to a Sudbury, Ont., buyer who had no firearms licence.

The seller made a number of gun-related sales via the darknet before being arrested, each time wrapping the products in plastic and then in Mylar bags before finally disguising them in food packaging.

"Darknet vendors resort to very ingenious means to ship firearms and related components," O'Reilly said. "In the darknet community, this is known as stealth shipping, and the intent is to disguise or hide the actual contents from law enforcement and border services."

Pistols have been sent in gaming consoles, computer hard drives, hairdryers and blocks of chocolate, he said. …

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