Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Online Tumult over Breastfeeding Photo Challenges Stigmas, Highlights Hurdles

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Online Tumult over Breastfeeding Photo Challenges Stigmas, Highlights Hurdles

Article excerpt

Tumult over breastfeeding photo highlights hurdles

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TORONTO - A photo of a hockey player breastfeeding her baby between periods has riled social media, and that uproar has some lactation experts bemoaning how such a natural act continues to be sexualized and shamed.

Dr. Dan Flanders of Kindercare Pediatrics in Toronto called negative reaction to the photo "so incredibly disappointing."

"In a world that supports women and moms it should be a complete non-issue," Flanders said Thursday.

"It should be like shopping at the supermarket. It should be like driving in your car to work, it should have no emotional impact but it obviously unveils a lot of hangups that we have in our society now. I guess breasts are very sexualized in our world and people have hangups about sex and sexuality."

The Facebook photo of Serah Small breastfeeding her eight-week-old in an arena change room had drawn more than 1,000 likes and 500 shares by Thursday morning. In the photo, shared Monday by Milky Way Lactation Services, the Alberta mom is topless but still in her bulky hockey pants and skates.

The image and associated media stories have drawn strong online reaction, the vast majority of it appearing to be supportive, although some comments were not.

"Why do we have to keep going through this every few months," one reader posts. "I don't care where they feed their child as long as it's not in a fine restaurant. Most of these women are just attention seekers anyways."

Flanders says this kind of public shaming can make a difficult situation worse for some new moms, who are already at risk of feeling sad and isolated. He adds that it's very common to feel uncomfortable breastfeeding in public, partly because of public shaming and a lack of resources to support moms who struggle.

"If we lived in an environment that wasn't quite so -- dare I say -- misogynistic and uninterested in supporting new moms, I think they might find it a little bit less challenging to succeed at breastfeeding."

Stigma reaches far and wide, adds author and lactation expert Jack Newman, who says he, too, gets negative comments online -- often from other women who negatively view breastfeeding in public. …

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