Newspaper article The Canadian Press

In the News Today, April 9

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

In the News Today, April 9

Article excerpt

In the news today, April 9

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Six stories in the news for Monday, April 9

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BRONCOS PASTOR RECALLS THE 'VALLEY OF DARKNESS'

Thousands gathered last night to remember the 15 people who died when the Humboldt Broncos' bus crashed on Friday. And they heard a heart-rending recollection from the team chaplain who happened upon the terrible scene and heard sounds of the dying. Pastor Sean Brandow told a vigil in the Saskatchewan junior hockey team's home arena "We walked up on a scene I never want to see again, to sounds I never want to hear again." Brandow encouraged the grieving crowd to lean on their faith as they struggle to deal with the tragedy.

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B.C. BLAMED AS TRANS MOUNTAIN PUT ON HOLD

The future of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion was cast in doubt Sunday as Kinder Morgan Canada suspended all non-essential activities and related spending on the project in the face of mounting opposition from British Columbia. With the company citing its decision largely on the B.C. government's legal challenges to the pipeline and the need to protect its shareholders, the federal and Alberta governments pushed Premier John Horgan to abandon his promise to do whatever his government can to stop the project.

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INQUIRY TO BEGIN INTO DEATH OF TWINS ON BOBSLED TRACK

A fatality inquiry is convening today to begin reviewing how twin brothers died after sliding down an Olympic luge-bobsled track in Calgary more than two years ago. Jordan and Evan Caldwell, who were 17, were part of a group that snuck onto the grounds of the WinSport facility with plastic sleds and headed down the icy track that was built for the 1988 Olympics. They hit a gate at high speed and died almost instantly, while six other young men were injured.

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B.C. TAKES NEW APPROACH TO TESTING OLDER DRIVERS

Last month, the B.C. government introduced its Enhanced Road Assessment program -- the second stage of its fitness testing program for driver's licences. It replaced the former DriveABLE program, which drew criticism from seniors for its reliance on computer tests and road tests in unfamiliar vehicles. B.C.'s seniors advocate Isobel Mackenzie says the new program is less daunting for seniors, but she's still concerned about targeting drivers just because they're 80 years old. …

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