Newspaper article The Canadian Press

CP Explains: How Bodies Are Identified by the Authorities

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

CP Explains: How Bodies Are Identified by the Authorities

Article excerpt

CP Explains: How bodies are identified

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TORONTO - Authorities in Saskatchewan apologized Monday for an identity mix-up in which a hockey player was identified as among the 15 killed in last week's bus crash -- only to discover it was, in fact, his teammate that was killed.

Here's a look at how the identification process generally unfolds when someone is found dead:

How identification happens in straightforward cases:

The mainstay of the identification effort for most medical examiners and coroners in Canada is the visual identification. For example, someone is found dead in an apartment. The superintendent or a relative who found the person or otherwise knows the person then positively identifies the deceased. If what they say checks out with other identifying information -- a passport or driver's licence -- that's probably going to be sufficient.

"When you're thinking about visual identification, that is often in circumstances where there are a number of other pieces of information that suggest that's who the person is," said Dr. Dirk Huyer, chief coroner in Ontario.

What if a body is decomposed or badly disfigured?

While fingerprints, X-rays, and characteristic tattoos or other markings on a body may help in the identification process, coroners will usually reach for dental records. That means taking the body to the local morgue, having a forensic dentist examine the teeth of the dead person, then comparing them with the person's dental records.

"That's often the easiest and quickest way to identify a body," said Dr. Matt Bowes, chief medical examiner for Nova Scotia.

Another option is using genetic matching. The problem is that it can take time to get the DNA comparisons done.

"You want to give information to families quickly and you want to figure things out as quickly as you can, so it's always at the moment thinking what is the best approach to take," Huyer said.

What difficulties did the Saskatchewan coroner face in the bus crash? …

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