Newspaper article Manchester Evening News

Five Ways to Pollen-Proof Your Garden for a Sneeze-Free Summer

Newspaper article Manchester Evening News

Five Ways to Pollen-Proof Your Garden for a Sneeze-Free Summer

Article excerpt

HAY fever, also known as allergic rhinitis, affects one in four people, while around 80% of those with asthma also have hay fever, according to Asthma UK.

It's set off by a reaction to pollen during early spring and summer, as well as mould spores from rotting logs, fallen leaves, compost, and on grasses and grains. But there are ways to reduce the allergens: ¦ LOSE THE LAWN GRASSES are among the main causes, as they're wind-pollinated. Decking, gravel or paving may be the answer. If you can't bear to lose your grass, mow it frequently to stop grasses flowering. ¦ ¦¦¦ LOW-ALLERGEN PLANTING GO for plants which are doubleflowered. Bees might love openflowered daisy-like plants, but hay fever sufferers do not.

Go for insect-pollinated plants, whose flowers enclose the pollen, so insects have to climb inside - foxgloves, honeysuckle, penstemon and snapdragon. ¦ DON'T RULE OUT ROSES ROSES produce heavy pollen, which is less likely to be spread by the wind, but pick hybrids rather than wild roses. …

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