Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Grey Whale Buried at B.C. Dump Exhumed Added to Provincial Museum's Collection

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Grey Whale Buried at B.C. Dump Exhumed Added to Provincial Museum's Collection

Article excerpt

Buried whale's bones added to museum's collection

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UCLUELET, B.C. - They arrived at the dump ready to dig up a grey whale's grave, carrying shovels, rakes, brushes and small garden tools, hoping the decomposition process had done the job of cleaning the bones and deodorizing the carcass after being buried for more than three years.

A landfill on the west coast of Vancouver Island was the site of a unique event where scientists and about a dozen volunteers recently exhumed the 10-metre long whale.

When the body of the young female washed up on Wickaninnish Beach at Pacific Rim National Park Reserve in April 2015, officials had to act quickly: haul the marine mammal out to sea or save the skeleton by burying it at the local dump.

The decision was made to preserve the bones for science, and that's how a filter-feeding cetacean, which can reach lengths of almost 15 metres and weigh up to 36 tonnes, ended up covered in dirt at the Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District landfill in Ucluelet.

"It could have been towed offshore and just sunk and nature would have recycled it, and that's fine," said Gavin Hanke, curator of vertebrate zoology at the Royal British Columbia Museum. "But this specimen now is available for anyone to look at."

Bald eagles screeched overhead and garbage trucks rumbled in the distance as the digging crew approached the burial mound that resembled a forest after three years, thick with prickly blackberry bushes and one-metre tall alder saplings that swayed in the wind.

After about one hour of hacking, digging and raking, large bones started to emerge.

Hanke, who came prepared to work in a smelly whale mess, put his gloves to his face and smiled.

"The whale itself smells like soil," he said. "It's fantastic. It doesn't faze me at all to do this."

The bones will be cleaned, catalogued and become part of the provincial museum's marine mammal research collection, Hanke said.

Out of the burial site came individual vertebrae the size of small aircraft propellers and ribs longer than yard sticks. It took four people to lift the whale's intact skull and jaw into the back of a pickup.

"The material is available for scientists around the world to come and measure, study, take DNA samples and look for stable isotopes for ecology," said Hanke. …

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