Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Business News Advisory

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Business News Advisory

Article excerpt

Business News Advisory

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Here are the CP Business Department's afternoon plans for today. All times Eastern unless otherwise stated. All ETAs and wordcounts approximate. Entries are subject to change as news develops. If you have any questions, please don't hesitate to contact Jody White at 416-507-2024 or jody.white@thecanadianpress.com. We can also be reached at 416-507-2138.

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DEVELOPING:

We're watching the loonie and the TSX as the former sinks and the latter flirts with new highs.

Ross Marowits will have a story from Chrystia Freeland's speech to the Montreal Council on International Relations. ETA 3:45, 350 words

Tara Deschamps will have a story on Tim Hortons' plan to upgrade its distribution system. ETA 3:15

Dan Healing is attending the Solar Canada conference in Calgary.

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TOP STORIES:

Canada's steel no security threat: Ross

Cda-US-Trade

OTTAWA -- The U.S. commerce secretary says Canada is not a national security threat and that a revitalized NAFTA could make the Trump administration's tariffs on steel and aluminum go away.Wilbur Ross also acknowledged Wednesday that the U.S. doesn't have a trade deficit on steel with Canada -- in fact, he says, it has a surplus with its northern neighbour in terms of dollar value. PHOTO. Will be writethru; moves Business and National, guard against duplication

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Toronto stock index hits record high

Dollar-Markets

TORONTO -- Canada's main stock index hit a record high in late morning trading Wednesday, boosted by a broad-based rally on the market.The S&P/TSX composite index was up 97.66 points to 16,414.19, after 90 minutes of trading -- just off its high of 16,424.82 for the day, which was above the previous record of 16,421.42. PHOTO.

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Shoe smuggling claim 'laughable:' experts

Trump-Tariffs

U.S. President Donald Trump's claim Canadians are smuggling shoes across the border to avoid "massive" tariffs on American goods doesn't make sense, experts say."It's great for American retailers if Canadians go cross-border shopping," said Werner Antweiler, an associate professor at the University of British Columbia's Sauder School of Business. PHOTO. Runs Business and National, guard against duplication. …

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