Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Actress Eve Hewson on Having a Strong Role Model in Rock Star Dad Bono

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Actress Eve Hewson on Having a Strong Role Model in Rock Star Dad Bono

Article excerpt

Eve Hewson on how U2 shaped acting choices

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TORONTO - Irish actress Eve Hewson says she honed a discerning eye for film projects at an early age, by critiquing the songs and set lists of her famous dad Paul Hewson, a.k.a. Bono.

"One of the reasons I think I'm sort of good at picking projects and picking directors and finding the right roles is because I grew up a part of the conversation with my dad's music and their shows," Hewson says by phone from New York, casually dropping a reference to her dad's super group -- U2.

"Ever since we were kids he would always ask me and my sister: 'What do you think? Did you like this song? Do you like that chorus? Did you like that set list?' We've always been encouraged to develop our own opinions and so I've been able to, hopefully, bring that into my own career."

Hewson is on her way to becoming star in her own right.

In addition to her TV breakout in the defunct period saga "The Knick," she's notched a variety of film credits, including the Steven Spielberg drama "Bridge of Spies" and the Nicole Holofcener romantic comedy "Enough Said."

This Friday she stars in the coming-of-age tale "Paper Year," the feature directorial debut of Canadian writer/director Rebecca Addelman.

Hewson plays 22-year-old Franny, an aspiring TV writer and newlywed, while her new husband is aspiring actor Dan, played by Vancouver's Avan Jogia. Andie MacDowell co-stars as Franny's wary mother and Hamish Linklater is a fellow scribe who takes Franny under his wing when she lands her first writing gig.

The Ottawa-born Addelman, who honed her comedic skills in Toronto before moving to Los Angeles, says the story was inspired by her own experience marrying young, although the specific ways the characters act out has been dramatized.

"We were in such a vulnerable spot in life, you know," says Addelman, who was 25 when she got engaged to her 22-year-old boyfriend.

"We didn't have money, our careers weren't going yet, we just had dreams. And we had a lot of hope. And we were clinging to that, which is a perfectly fine thing to cling to, it can give you a lot. …

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