Newspaper article The Canadian Press

PREP-Lifewatch

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

PREP-Lifewatch

Article excerpt

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(HKO-Sask-Bus-Crash-Gobeil)

A Humboldt Broncos player who suffered a brain injury in the team's bus crash still has a long road to recovery.

The family of Morgan Gobeil says in a statement that the 19-year-old is recovering, but will still be in hospital for a few more months.

Gobeil's family says he's a "tough kid" and is using all the determination that made him successful in sports and school to keep moving forward.

They say he knows he was in a bus accident, but he doesn't know the extent of what happened.

Gobeil suffered a significant brain injury in April when the Broncos' team bus and a transport truck collided at a highway crossing.

Sixteen people, including 10 players, were killed and 13 players were injured. (The Canadian Press)

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(Workplace Light)

A new study finds Americans like the perks at work, but they also need one big basic to make them happy.

The number one must-have for American workers when it comes to office extras is natural light and views to the outside world.

The majority of workers surveyed in the Future Workplace study, called "The Employee Experience," say they need good, old fashioned sunshine to brighten their mood, promote engagement and productivity.

The glare from computers has the opposite effects.

Seventy-three per cent agree that the longer they use their gadgets, the more they long to take a walk or glance outside. (ABC)

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(Survey-Teens-and-Social-Media)

A new poll finds that teenagers in the U-S say social media has a positive effect on their lives, helping them feel more confident, less lonely and less depressed.

The poll was released Monday by Common Sense Media, a San Francisco-based non-profit focused on kids' use of media and technology.

The majority of respondents said social media makes no difference in how depressed they feel

But 29 per cent said it makes them feel less depressed and 11 per cent said it makes them more depressed.

Thirty-nine per cent said it makes them feel less lonely and 13 per cent, more lonely. …

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