Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

City Welcomes Home World War I Doughboys

Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

City Welcomes Home World War I Doughboys

Article excerpt

Pittsburgh railroad stations were frequent transfer points for Army and Navy veterans headed home after World War I fighting stopped. The conflict had ended the previous month - on Nov. 11, 1918 - with an armistice, and many newly discharged service members found themselves with hours to kill as they waited here to change trains.

"They had been informed through the Red Cross booths at the railroad stations of the good time that awaited them at the [newly opened service] club," the Gazette Times reported on Dec. 26. Both local and out-of-town veterans "dropped in to share in the cheery greetings that were being extended to all service men as Pittsburgh's Christmas tribute to the Army and Navy."

" 'Oh, joy! Oh, Boy! Where do we go from here?' chorused a group of lusty 'gobs' and 'doughboys' as they stood around a piano in the rooms of the Soldiers and Sailors' Club." The club on Sixth Avenue had opened and been dedicated by Mayor Eugene V. Babcock on Christmas Day.

The new institution drew good reviews from the service members. "It's great," Cpl. Robert M. McCullough told the Gazette's anonymous reporter. He was traveling back to his hometown of Akron, Ohio, with a service buddy from Cleveland, Pvt. F.D. Snowden. Both men had been hurt during the fighting in France. McCullough had been wounded in his leg and arm by shrapnel during the Battle of Saint-Mihiel. …

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