Newspaper article The Canadian Press

NHL Called in Cree Helps Revive, Sustain Indigenous Language: Hockey Analyst

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

NHL Called in Cree Helps Revive, Sustain Indigenous Language: Hockey Analyst

Article excerpt

NHL called in Cree boosts language: Chabot

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An NHL game called in Plains Cree is a step toward keeping Indigenous languages alive, says a hockey analyst.

Former NHL centre John Chabot will join play-by-play announcer Clarence Iron, musician Earl Wood and Cree teacher Jason Chamakese in a Winnipeg studio on Sunday.

The panel will provide commentary and analysis of a game between the Montreal Canadiens and Carolina Hurricanes for the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network.

"When you look at people's claims to heritage and traditions, it all goes back to language," Chabot told The Canadian Press on Friday.

"We're trying to re-introduce our languages into a lot of communities where it's slipped over the last number of years. This just gives us more of an opportunity to let our kids know that our language is valued.

"To be able to present it on TV to a national audience is fantastic."

The only other NHL broadcast in an Canadian Indigenous language happened Jan. 30, 2010, when a game between Montreal and the Ottawa Senators was delivered in the Inuit language Inuktitut.

Chabot played 500 NHL games over eight seasons for Montreal, Pittsburgh and Detroit.

He has coached in the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League and spent two seasons as an assistant coach of the New York Islanders.

He also has been a coach on APTN's hockey series "Hit the Ice".

The reality TV series features young Aboriginal players from across Canada at camps and tryouts, with the chance to be scouted by junior and pro leagues.

Brady Keeper, a Cree defenceman from Cross Lake, Man., became the first alumnus of the show to sign an NHL contract this past week when the 22-year-old and the Florida Panthers agreed to a two-year deal.

Chabot will be the commentator not speaking Cree on Sunday.

Hailing from the Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg First Nation north of Ottawa, where Algonquin is the mother tongue, Chabot says he himself is an example of the need to maintain Indigenous language as he speaks "a bit" of Algonquin. …

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