Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Prospect of Breakdancing Becoming Olympic Sport Draws Mixed Reactions

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Prospect of Breakdancing Becoming Olympic Sport Draws Mixed Reactions

Article excerpt

Mixed reaction over prospect of breakdancing at Olympics

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TORONTO - Canadian breakdancers are expressing mixed feelings about the danceform moving closer to becoming an Olympic sport -- with some enthusiastic about the possibility and others concerned it may alter the underground culture around the activity.

Known more commonly as breaking, the dance is being considered for the 2024 Games in Paris, with a final decision expected in December 2020.

Mandy Cruz, a 22-year-old breaker in Toronto, said she's excited at the prospect.

"It was a really great moment that dance is being recognized as a sport, because it's very physically demanding and you do have to train your body like an athlete," she said. "A lot of people overlook dancing, like it's an easy hobby."

Cruz said she was curious to see how breaking would be judged if it becomes an Olympic sport. Since it's also an artform, she said it can't be judged on athleticism alone. In typical "break battles," judges also look for creativity and originality, she said.

And while even the possibility of becoming an Olympic sport could raise the profile of the activity, Cruz said she believes breaking will continue to be important at a local level.

"There's a lot of people of colour going to this culture, because there's oppression going on around them," she said. "There's a lot of things going on around them in this world that (breaking) is just an outlet for."

Caerina Abrenica, an instructor with the Toronto B-Girl Movement, which supports young girls in the danceform, said a spot in the Olympic games could help boost female representation in breaking.

"Having a b-girl category in the Olympics would allow more b-girls worldwide to see the potential of where women are taking it in the dance," she said.

Some breakers, however, are concerned about the potential elevation to the Olympic level. …

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