Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

U.S. Needs to Stop Wasteful Spending

Newspaper article Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)

U.S. Needs to Stop Wasteful Spending

Article excerpt

The June 30 column by David M. Shribman, "Neighbors, Friends," commended the long-lasting peace and friendship between the United States and Canada. The same applies to the United States and Mexico, the other North American nation that spans the continent between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans.

Life expectancy at birth is a measure of national physical health. According to the annual World Almanac, in 2003, life expectancy was 79.8 years in Canada, 76.7 years in the United States and 72.1 years in Mexico. In 2019, life expectancy is 82.1 years in Canada, 80.1 years in the United States and 76.8 years in Mexico. Life expectancy, therefore, increased by 2.3 years in Canada, by 3.4 years in the United States and by 4.7 years in Mexico.

Another measure available in the 2019 World Almanac is the percentage of national budget allocated to health care. That was 10.5% by Canada, 17.1% by the United States and 6.9% by Mexico.

The national budget, therefore, is much higher in the United States than in the two other North American nations. Yet the life expectancy in Canada is higher by two years, despite spending less. The United States government should eliminate wasteful spending on health care.

HERBERT BARRY III

Oakland

The writer is professor emeritus at the University of Pittsburgh.

Socialism definition

As requested by the June 28 letter "Not a Dirty Word," I looked up the definition of socialism and found it to be enlightening to say the least.

One definition is: "In theory, based on public benefits, socialism has the greatest goal of common wealth. Since the government controls almost all of society's functions, it can make better use of resources, labors and lands. Socialism reduces disparity in wealth, not only in different areas, but also in all societal ranks and classes."

Wow, that sounds great doesn't it? A few decide what is good for many. …

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