Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Dan's Hungry Colleagues Say He Should Just Go Ahead and Make the Darned Croissants Already

Newspaper article St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)

Dan's Hungry Colleagues Say He Should Just Go Ahead and Make the Darned Croissants Already

Article excerpt

How much effort are you willing to put into cooking?

A new cookbook crossed my desk the other day (it's so new, it won't even be published until the end of October). "Poilâne," by Apollonia Poilâne, features the recipes of what it says is a world-famous bread bakery in Paris called, yes, Poilâne.

Many of the recipes look intriguing -- most of them, really. But the one that has truly caught my eye, the one I keep going back to look at again and again, is the recipe for croissants.

I love croissants. You love croissants. But do you have any idea how much time and effort goes into making them?

The best croissant I have ever had, if I were inclined to rank them (which I am), was at Hewn bakery in Evanston, Ill., just north of Chicago. It was layer after layer of crisp, flaky, buttery goodness. Every bite caused a mini-explosion of pastry and butter in my mouth, and my only wish was that there were more bites to be had.

I wasn't surprised it was so good -- though to be fair, I wasn't expecting it to be so spectacular -- because I had interviewed the bakery's owner, Ellen King, a few months earlier. She was in town for a book signing of her first cookbook, "Heritage Baking: Recipes for Rustic Breads and Pastries Baked With Artisanal Flour From Hewn Bakery."

She mentioned her croissants in passing, and I asked if she made them the right way: If she took a full three days to make them. She said she did, and the proof, when I later tried one, was in the flake and the flavor.

Which brings me back to the croissants in "Poilâne." These, too, take three days to make.

Will I make them? Would you?

It is not as if you would be working on them nonstop for 72 hours. Mostly, the dough is just sitting in the refrigerator for a couple of hours at a time, or overnight. The problem is, you have to be around every couple of hours to work with the dough a bit before refrigerating it again. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.