Newspaper article The Canadian Press

CMHC Says Vancouver Market No Longer 'Highly Vulnerable' as Price Acceleration Eases

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

CMHC Says Vancouver Market No Longer 'Highly Vulnerable' as Price Acceleration Eases

Article excerpt

CMHC says Vancouver market no longer 'highly vulnerable'

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OTTAWA - The Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp. has lowered the vulnerability rating of Vancouver's housing market to "moderate," marking the first change in three years as prices have eased.

The federal agency says in a report that "evidence of price acceleration" in Vancouver has eased to low, prompting a downrating after 12 consecutive quarters of being flagged as "highly vulnerable."

"While home price growth over the past few years significantly outpaced levels supported by fundamentals, these imbalances have narrowed through growth in fundamentals and lower home prices in different segments of the resale market," CMHC said in its latest Housing Market Assessment report.

The agency said a moderate degree of vulnerability remains at the national level, but imbalances between house prices and housing market fundamentals have narrowed over the past year. However, certain markets such as Toronto and Victoria are at higher risk.

Nationally, the inflation-adjusted average price decreased 5.6 per cent in the first quarter of 2019 from the same period a year earlier, the fifth-consecutive decline on a year-over-year basis, CMHC said.

In the previous quarter's report, CMHC lowered its rating for Canada's overall housing market from to moderate from high vulnerability -- where it had stood for 10 consecutive quarters -- as mortgage stress tests introduced last year made it harder for homebuyers to qualify and eased price acceleration.

The Canadian Real Estate Association's latest market forecast released in June projects that the national average price will drop 0.6 per cent by the end of this year to roughly $485,000, compared to the 4.1 per cent drop recorded in 2018.

However, the pattern is split between the eastern and western parts of the country. For example, while average prices are forecast to fall in British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan, higher prices are expected in Ontario, Quebec and the Maritimes. …

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