Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Growing Number of Newcomers, Refugees Ending Up Homeless in Canada, Studies Say

Newspaper article The Canadian Press

Growing Number of Newcomers, Refugees Ending Up Homeless in Canada, Studies Say

Article excerpt

More of Canada's homeless are newcomers

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OTTAWA - A growing number of newcomers to Canada are ending up in shelters or are finding themselves homeless, newly released government figures show.

Two new reports released this week by Employment and Social Development Canada offer a glimpse into the extent of the homelessness problem across the country and reveal the populations that are most vulnerable.

The national shelter study, which looked at federal data on shelter users between 2005 and 2016, found an "observable increase" in refugees using shelters.

In 2016, there were 2,000 refugees sleeping in shelters, not counting those facilities designated specifically for refugees -- an increase from 1,000 just two years earlier when the figures first began to be tracked.

Tim Richter, president of the Canadian Alliance to End Homelessness, said he believes refugees are being forced to turn to homeless shelters because of a lack of housing capacity in areas where refugees are settling.

"Many of them are coming to Toronto in Ontario, and to Quebec, and in those communities, the rental market is just really tight and we just don't have the capacity to house them," Richter said.

"Homelessness is a function of housing affordability, availability and income. When you're new to Canada, you generally won't have the income to be able to buy a house, and there's just not enough affordable housing options."

Canada has been experiencing an influx of asylum seekers crossing into Canada "irregularly," avoiding official checkpoints between the Canada-U.S. border in order to file for refugee protection without being turned away under Canada's Safe Third Country Agreement with the U.S. Over 46,000 irregular border-crossers have been intercepted by RCMP since early 2017.

Many of them have been staying in Toronto and Montreal to await the outcome of their refugee claims, which has put pressure on temporary housing capacity in those cities.

The city of Toronto estimated in late 2018 that about 40 per cent of people using its shelters identified as refugees or asylum claimants. Other Ontario cities have been asked to help relocate refugees in order to ease the burden on Toronto's shelter system.

Meanwhile, a second study released this week by Ottawa that offers a "point-in-time" snapshot of homelessness in 61 communities also noted a trend of homelessness among newcomers. …

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