4
WINTER OF DISCONTENT

I

When Daniel Reed Larned returned to his job as General Burnside's secretary in the first days of October, the camp was in an uproar over a visit by President Lincoln. Generals and staff officers dragged the gangly chief executive up Loudoun Heights, all over Harpers Ferry, across the Potomac to Maryland Heights, and on October 3 they dangled his legs over the sides of a horse to review that part of the army perched on the banks of the Potomac at the mouth of Antietam Creek. Burnside, gracefully at home in the saddle, accompanied the president as he sauntered before the Ninth Corps. The general waved a voluminous gauntlet at the 9th New York, stopping to explain that these were the zouaves who had nearly won the day at Antietam. Lincoln nodded approvingly, while a private in the rear ranks took stock of the exalted visitor.

"Ain't the old bugger lean?" the zouave stage-whispered. "He wouldn't pay for skinnin'."

Later the president and McClellan climbed into an ambulance for a final circuit of the battlefield itself, where they had a chat before Lincoln returned to Washington. As the two departed, Burnside went back to his headquarters to greet a welcome guest. 1

Mrs. Burnside had come from Baltimore under Mr. Larned's escort, and while she and the general secluded themselves in his quarters, the secretary dove into September's stack of unanswered correspondence.

-151-

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Burnside
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • Prologue - The River 1
  • 1 - Arm'D Year-Year of the Struggle 7
  • 2 - The Carolina Shore 41
  • 3 - My Maryland 97
  • 4 - Winter of Discontent 151
  • 5 - Chants of Ohio 218
  • 6 - Twice across the Cumberland 264
  • 7 - Again Virginia's Summer Sky 344
  • Epilogue - The Undiscover'D Country 419
  • Notes 427
  • Bibliography 481
  • Sources and Acknowledgments 495
  • Index 497
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