6
TWICE ACROSS THE CUMBERLAND

I

By "other work," Burnside alluded to the long-postponed invasion of East Tennessee. When Halleck took the Ninth Corps away in June, he implied the East Tennessee campaign would have to wait until those troops returned, and though he did not specify when, he did indicate they would come back. Lately he had been badgering Burnside about the invasion, though, even during the hunt for Morgan. Now he demanded a count of the men Burnside could spare for the operation. With the Ninth Corps still detached, and much of his cavalry scouring Ohio, Burnside could find only six thousand available men. So inferior a force would be pretty vulnerable south of the Cumberland, he noted, but once the Ninth Corps arrived or Morgan was run down, he would have the men available to assure their supply line, at which time he would start them off. Halleck responded that that was not good enough. Reversing his earlier promise, he warned that the Ninth Corps might never be returned to him. Revealing an appalling ignorance of both the devastation Morgan's raid had wrought on civilian morale and the demonstrated incompetence of the militia, Halleck went on to tell Burnside East Tennessee was more important than checking "petty raids" like Morgan's. "The militia and Home Guards must take care of these raids," he wrote, evidently intending no irony. 1

Yet another discouragement impeded a movement out of Kentucky. Colonel John Scott, the Louisiana cavalryman, burst into eastern Kentucky again before Morgan gave up the ghost. He brought a brigade of

-264-

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Burnside
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • Prologue - The River 1
  • 1 - Arm'D Year-Year of the Struggle 7
  • 2 - The Carolina Shore 41
  • 3 - My Maryland 97
  • 4 - Winter of Discontent 151
  • 5 - Chants of Ohio 218
  • 6 - Twice across the Cumberland 264
  • 7 - Again Virginia's Summer Sky 344
  • Epilogue - The Undiscover'D Country 419
  • Notes 427
  • Bibliography 481
  • Sources and Acknowledgments 495
  • Index 497
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