History of England: From the Fall of Wolsey to the Death of Elizabeth - Vol. 6

By James Anthony Froude | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXX.
QUEEN JANE AND QUEEN MARY.

THE death of Edward VI. was ushered in with signs and wonders, as if heaven and earth were in labour with revolution. The hail lay upon the grass in the London gardens as red as blood. At Middleton Stony in Oxfordshire, anxious lips reported that a child had been born with one body, two heads, four feet and hands,1 About the time when the letters patent were signed there came a storm such as no living Englishman remembered. The summer evening grew black as night. Cataracts of water flooded the houses in the city and turned the streets into rivers; trees were torn up by the roots and whirled through the air, and a more awful omen --the forked lightning -- struck down the steeple of the church where the heretic service had been read for the first time.2

July.
Signs in
earth and
signs in
heaven be
fore the
death of
Edward.

The king died a little before nine o'clock on Thursday evening. His death was made a secret; but in the same hour a courier was galloping through the twilight to Hunsdon to bid Mary mount and fly. Her plans had been for some days prepared. She had been directed to remain quiet, but

A courier
carries the
news to
Mary,

____________________
1
Grey Friars' Chronicle: Machyn.
2
Baoardo's History of the Revolution in England on th 3 Death of Edward VI., printed at Venice, 1558. A copy of this rare book is in the Bodleian Library at Oxford.

-15-

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History of England: From the Fall of Wolsey to the Death of Elizabeth - Vol. 6
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents of Volume VI v
  • Chapter XXX - Queen Jane and Queen Mary 15
  • Chapter XXXI - The Spanish Marriage 132
  • Chapter XXXII - Reconciliation with Rome 233
  • Chapter XXXIII - The Martyrs 314
  • Chapter XXXIV - Calais 403
  • Chapter XXXV - Death of Mary 472
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