History of England: From the Fall of Wolsey to the Death of Elizabeth - Vol. 6

By James Anthony Froude | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXXI.
THE SPANISH MARRIAGE

THE fears of Renard and the hopes of Noailles were occasioned by the unanimity of Catholics and heretics in the opposition to the marriage; yet, so singular was the position of parties, that this very unanimity was the condition which made the marriage possible. The Catholic lords and gentlemen were jealous of English independence, and, had they stood alone, they would have coerced the queen into an abandonment of her intentions: but, if they dreaded a Spanish sovereign, they hated unorthodoxy more, and if they permitted, or assisted in the schemes of the Reformers, they feared that they might lose the control of the situation when the immediate object was obtained. Those who were under the influence of Gardiner desired to restore persecution; and persecution, which was difficult with Mary on the throne, would be impossible under a sovereign brought in by a revolution. They made a favourite of Courtenay, but they desired to marry him to the queen, not to Elizabeth: Gardiner told the young earl that he would sooner see him the husband of the vilest drab who could be picked out of the London kennels.1

The Catholic gentlemen, who dislike the marriage, durst not oppose it by force,

For fear of plating into the hands of the Reformers

Thus, from their murmurs, they seemed to be on the edge of rebellion; yet, when the point of action came,

____________________
1
Renard to Charles V.: Rolls House MSS.

-132-

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History of England: From the Fall of Wolsey to the Death of Elizabeth - Vol. 6
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents of Volume VI v
  • Chapter XXX - Queen Jane and Queen Mary 15
  • Chapter XXXI - The Spanish Marriage 132
  • Chapter XXXII - Reconciliation with Rome 233
  • Chapter XXXIII - The Martyrs 314
  • Chapter XXXIV - Calais 403
  • Chapter XXXV - Death of Mary 472
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