History of England: From the Fall of Wolsey to the Death of Elizabeth - Vol. 6

By James Anthony Froude | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXXII.
RECONCILIATION WITH ROME.

MARY had restored Catholic orthodoxy, and her passion for Philip had been gratified. To complete her work and her happiness, it remained to bring back her subjects to the bosom of the Catholic Church. Reginald Pole had by this time awakened from some part of his delusions. He had persuaded himself that he had but to appear with a pardon in his hand to be welcomed to his country with acclamation: he had ascertained that the English people were very indifferent to the pardon, and that his own past treasons had created especial objections to himself. Even the queen herself had grown impatient with him. He had fretted her with his importunities; his presence in Flanders had chafed the parliament and made her marriage more difficult; while he was supposed to share with the English nobles their jealousy of a foreign sovereign. So general was this last impression about him, that his nephew, Lord Stafford's son, who was one of the refugees, went to seek him in the expectation of countenance and sympathy: and, farther, he had been in correspondence with Gardiner, and was believed to be at the bottom of the chancellor's religious indiscretions.1 Thus his anxiety to be in England found nowhere any answering desire; and Renard, who dreaded his want of wis

Reginald Pole finds
England less
accessible
expected.

____________________
1
Renard.

-233-

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History of England: From the Fall of Wolsey to the Death of Elizabeth - Vol. 6
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents of Volume VI v
  • Chapter XXX - Queen Jane and Queen Mary 15
  • Chapter XXXI - The Spanish Marriage 132
  • Chapter XXXII - Reconciliation with Rome 233
  • Chapter XXXIII - The Martyrs 314
  • Chapter XXXIV - Calais 403
  • Chapter XXXV - Death of Mary 472
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