The Desert of the Exodus: Journeys on Foot in the Wilderness of the Forty Years' Wanderings; Undertaken in Connection with the Ordnance Survey of Sinai and the Palestine Exploration Fund

By E. H. Palmer | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXIV.
MOAB.

Description of the Country. — Kir-Haraseth; meaning of the Term. — Nagb Jerrah. — Camp of the Beni Hamídeh. — Baal Peor. — Search for "Moabite Stones." — "Lot's Wife." — Site of the Cities of the Plain. — Shíhán. — El Yehúdíyeh. — Solomon's Tomb. — A Council of War. — Arab Hospitality. — Journey through Moab. — Wády Mojib, the Arnon. — Dibon. — The Moabite Stone; its History and Contents. — Umm Rasás. — Ruined Tower. — Arab Legend. — Wády Wáleh. — Ancient Sites. — Mount Nebo. — Antiquarian Prospects in Moab. — The Ford of the Jordan. — The Promised Land at last.

LEAVING the Ghor, which toward this point is very swampy, we passed a ruined fort, called Tell 'Abd er Rahím, and, crossing the Seil Hadítheh, a broad stream of water that might almost be called a river, began the ascent of the Nagb Jerrah into the hills of Moab.

Moab is a country about fifty miles long by twenty broad, and includes the table-land on the eastern shore of the Dead Sea, as well as that part of the Ghor which lies on the eastern bank of the Jordan, opposite Jericho. The plains are well watered and very productive, resembling in character the southern Ghor, which I have already described. The uplands consist of a rolling plateau about 3200 feet above the sea-level, the western edge being cut up into deep valleys, and descending by a series of sloping hills, at angles of forty-five and fifty degrees, into the Dead Sea. These uplands are naturally divided into two districts by the great chasm of Wády Mojib, the Arnon of Scripture; of these the northern portion is called by the modern Arabs El Belga,* and extends as far north as the mountain of Gilead; while the southern part is known as El Kerek, and reaches southward to the wády of that name.

____________________
*
The word is usually (and properly) written Belka, but the Bedawfn change the hard k into g, and I have throughout this volume followed the local pronunciation.

-392-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Desert of the Exodus: Journeys on Foot in the Wilderness of the Forty Years' Wanderings; Undertaken in Connection with the Ordnance Survey of Sinai and the Palestine Exploration Fund
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 470

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.