The Desert of the Exodus: Journeys on Foot in the Wilderness of the Forty Years' Wanderings; Undertaken in Connection with the Ordnance Survey of Sinai and the Palestine Exploration Fund

By E. H. Palmer | Go to book overview

APPENDIX.

A. See p. 21.

VENIMUS itaque in Pharan civitatem, in qua pugnavit Moyses cum Amalech, ubi est oratorium cujus altare positum est super lapides illos quos subposuerunt Moyse orante. In ipso loco est civitas munita muris e lateribus et locus valde sterilis procter* aquas. Ibi occurrerunt nobis mulieres cum infantibus, palmas in manibus portantes et ampullas cum rosaceo oleo; prostratæ pedibus nostris plantas ungebant et capita nostra, lingua Ægyptiaca psallantes antiphonam, Benedicti vos a domino benedictusque adventus vester, Hosanna in Excelsis. Ipsa terra est Madianitarum et habitantes in ipsa civitate: dicitur quia ex familia Jethro, soceri Moysis descendunt. 80 condomæ militantes in publico cum uxoribus suis erant, annonam et vestes accipientes ex Ægypto et nullum laborem habentes, quia nee babent, ubi (solum colant) eo quod totum arenis (constat); et præter singulos dies§ singulas equas Saracenas (per) capita paleas et hordeum de publice accipientes (et) discurrentes cum ipsis per eremum pro custodia monasteriorum et eremitarum propter insidias Saracenorum. Ante quorum timorem non exagitantur Saraceni; nam exeuntes de ipsa civitate, fontem illi serrant et clavem tollunt secure: et illi quidem ab intus similiter faciunt propter insidias Saracenorum quia nee habent, ubi exeant foris, præter cœlum et arenam. — Extract from De locis sanctis guæ perambulavit Antoninus Martyr, mit Bemerkungen; herausgegeben von T. T. Tobler. 1863.


TRANSLATION.

So we came to the city of Pharan, where Moses fought with Amalek, where is an oratory, whose altar is set on those stones which, while Moses was praying, they put under [him]. In the very place is the city, fortified with walls of brick, and a place very barren except the waters. There women with children met us, bearing palms in their hands and flasks with oil of roses; falling down at our feet, they anointed our feet and our heads, singing in the Egyptian tongue the Anthem, "Blessed are ye of the Lord, and blessed your

____________________
*
The common reading is propter. As the valley is any thing but barren, Tuch ( Antoninus Martyr, seine Zeit und seine Pilger fahrt nach dem Morgenlande, Leipzig, 1864, 4to, p. 37) proposes to read "fertilis" for "sterilis," fruitful because of the waters. But it is plain ("totum arenis constat") that the traveler speaks of it as barren.
§
Præter singulos dies makes no sense: read "per" for "præter."
Tuch as before reads with the MSS. raphanino, radish-oil, of which Pliny, 23. 49, speaks, and says, 19.26, that it was made of the seed.
Condomæ. See Muratori in Ducange ed. Henschel, s.v. condamina "viri et feminæ servilis condicionis in una domo ae prædio, sibi ad excolendum, traditis habitantes et conviventes."
I. e., except in the neighborhood of the wells.

-437-

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