Austria-Hungary: Including Dalmatia and Bosnia; Handbook for Travellers

By Karl Baedeker | Go to book overview

X. Bosnia AND THE HERZEGOVINA.
85. From Bosnisch — Brod to Sarájevo429
From Doboj to Dônja Tuzla, 429. — From Dônja Tuzla to
 Zvornik, 430. — Excursions from Sarájevo, 432, 433.
86. From Sarájevo to Mostar and Gravosa ( Ragusa)433
From Jablanica to Bugojno, 434. — Source of the Buna,435.
 — From Mostar to Avtovac. From Hum to Trebinje, 436.
87 From Sarájevo to Goražda and Plevlje and back to
 Sarájevo viâ Priepolje and viâegrad
437
From Goražda to Foča, 438.
88. From (Agram) Doberlin viâ Novi to Banjaluka and viâ
 Travnik to Sarájevo
440
From Novi to Ogulin, 440. — Bugojno, 442.

Bosnia (Bosna) in the wider sense includes Bosnia Proper, the Herzegovina,Turkish Croatia (Krajina), and the ancient Rascia (Sandjak Novibasar): — that is, in all, the region bounded on the N.W. and N. by Croatia and Slavonia, on the E. by Servia, on the S. by Albania (Turk. Vilayet Prisren) and Montenegro, and on the S.W. and W. by Dalmatia. This territory, covering an area of 23,853 (or, without Novibasar, 19,961) sq. M., nominally forms the N. W. vilayet of the Ottoman Empire, but in accordance with the Treaty of Berlin of 13th July, 1878, followed by the convention of 21st April, 1879, has been occupied and, with the exception of the Sandjak Novibasar, governed by Austria-Hungary, under reservation of the sovereignty of the Sultan.

Inhabitants. The population of Bosnia, excluding the Sandjak Novibasar, numbered in 1895 1,592,000, and their nationality is almost exclusively Slavonic. About 673,250 profess the GreekOriental creed, 334,140 are Roman Catholics, 548,630 Mohammedans, and 8200 Jews. The last are mainly descendants of Jewish immigrants from Spain and Portugal in the 16-17th centuries.

History. The aboriginal inhabitants of Bosnia were Illyrians (Desidiates,Ardieri,Autariates, etc.) of the Celto-Illyrian stock of the Iapodes, who dwelt in the N.W. (the present district of Bihać). Bosnia is mentioned in history for the first time in the Roman period (34 B. C.), and in close connection with Dalmatia. The Roman sway over these lands was repeatedly shaken and finally destroyed (end of the 4th cent.) by the invasions of the Goths, which were followed in 610 by an inroad of the Croatians and by another of the Servians. The S.W. part of the country embraced Christianity under Justinian (527-565), and the rest of it was converted by the Servian apostles Cyril and Methodius about the year 880. From 940 onwards Bosnia was governed by elective princes or 'bans', who afterwards became

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Austria-Hungary: Including Dalmatia and Bosnia; Handbook for Travellers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Money-Table ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Maps x
  • Introduction xi
  • Abbreviations xviii
  • I - Vienna and Its Environs 1
  • Contents 1
  • II - Upper and Lower Austria, Salzkammergut, and Salzburg 83
  • Contents 83
  • III - Tyrol.. 127
  • Contents 127
  • IV - Styria, Carinthia, Carniola, and Istria 173
  • Contents 173
  • V - Bohemia and Moravia 215
  • Contents 215
  • VI - Galicia and the Bukowina 275
  • Contents 275
  • VII - Dalmatia 289
  • Contents 289
  • VIII - Hungary, Croatia, and Slavonia 317
  • Contents 317
  • IX - Transylvania 401
  • Contents 401
  • X - Bosnia and the Herzegovina 427
  • Contents 427
  • Index 443
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