Austria-Hungary: Including Dalmatia and Bosnia; Handbook for Travellers

By Karl Baedeker | Go to book overview

Austrian commissariat magazine, the admirably equipped Hospital (Pl. B, 1), and the cemetery of the immigrants, and crossing the brook Koševa, we reach (20 min.) a hollow between the valleys of the Koševa and the Sušica, where there is a café. Thence following the crest of the Gorica to the S., we come to a Gipsy Camp of some 30-70 men, women, and children, and beyond it the finest point of *View near the town. We descend by a footpath; or return to the café, descend the valley, turn to the S., and go through the camp to the town (½ hr.).

Another excursion (guide necessary) is by the steep paved road ascending behind the barracks (Pl. 4; D, 3) and by a footpath to (about 1 ½ hr.) the houses of Miljević, where we get an extensive view of the heights or the Trebević, of the Lukavica valley, and of the Treskavica (6982 ft.) and the Bjelašnica (6782 ft.), the highest mountains in Bosnia. We return by the old Jewish Burying Ground to the Alexander Bridge in the town (about 3 hrs. in all).

To IlidžE, 7 M., a pleasant excursion either by local train (station, see below) in ½ hr. (fare 24 h.) or by carriage (9 K. incl. 2 hrs.' stay). Ilidže ( 1640 ft.; Hungaria, Bosna, Austria, all belonging to government, R. 3 K. 60, D. 3 K. 20 h., pens. from 9 K., closed in winter), prettily situated on the Zeljeznica, a watering-place with thermal sulphur-springs (136° Fahr.), well managed bath-establishment (swimming bath), and pretty gardens. Horse-races in June. — An omnibus (20 h.) plies daily in 20 min. from the station of Ilidle to the *Source of the Basna, 2 M. to the S.W. (Turkish café, restaurant); view-tower and fish-breeding establishment. The Bosna rises in several springs at the base of the wooded Igmán (4095 ft.), and within a few hundred yards of its source attains a breadth of over 30 yda.

Mountain Ascent (Tourists' Club, see p. 431). A bridle-path ascends the Trebević (5345 ft.; refuge-hut; fine view), to the S., in 4 hrs. Horses (4-6 K.) should be engaged and paid for at the hotel; the horse-owner acts as guide. — From Ilidže (see above) walk or (better) ride (horse, see above; provisions should be taken) to the (9 hrs.) top of the Bjelašnica (6782 ft.; to the S. fine view), on which is a meteorological station (quarters). — Walk or ride to the (4 hrs.) Skakavac Waterfall (230 ft. in height). — Through the castle to the Han Vaso and to the Source of the Mosšćanica, with the reservoir of the waterworks.


86. From Sarájevo to Mostar and Gravosa (Ragusa.).

177 1/2 M. Railway (narrow-gauge and partly rack-and-pinion) to (84 M.) Mostar in 6 ½-8 ¾ hrs. (fares 10 K. 80, 8 K. 10, 5 K. 40 h.; two trains daily); from Mostar to (93 ½ M.) Gravosa, two trains daily in 6-8 ¼ hrs. (fares from. Sarájevo to Gravosa 23 K., 17 K. 26, 11 K. 50 h.). This interesting line traverses a fine mountain-district. Enquiry should be made beforehand as to the connection of the trains with the steamers at Gravosa or Metković.

Sarájevo, see p. 430. — The railway runs for some distance near the Bosna Line (p. 430) and then diverges to the left, crossing the Miljacka, to (5 M.) Ilidže (branch of 1 ¾ M. to the baths, see above). It then crosses the Željeznica and the Bosna, which rises 2 M. to the S.W. We next proceed past the base of the Igmán (see above) to (7 M.) Blažuj, a group of houses with a large khan, and past the inn of Križanje (where a road diverges to Busovaća and Travnik, p. 442). Then through a beautiful wooded valley viâ (11 M.) Hadźići and (15 ½ M.) Pazarić, whence the Bjelašnica (see above) may be reached in 2 hrs.' ride. — Crossing the saddle of Vilovae (2307 ft.), the train reaches (19 ½ M.) Tarčin (2126 ft.), a military station, on the Lepenica. To the W. rises the Bitovnja.

-433-

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Austria-Hungary: Including Dalmatia and Bosnia; Handbook for Travellers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Money-Table ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Maps x
  • Introduction xi
  • Abbreviations xviii
  • I - Vienna and Its Environs 1
  • Contents 1
  • II - Upper and Lower Austria, Salzkammergut, and Salzburg 83
  • Contents 83
  • III - Tyrol.. 127
  • Contents 127
  • IV - Styria, Carinthia, Carniola, and Istria 173
  • Contents 173
  • V - Bohemia and Moravia 215
  • Contents 215
  • VI - Galicia and the Bukowina 275
  • Contents 275
  • VII - Dalmatia 289
  • Contents 289
  • VIII - Hungary, Croatia, and Slavonia 317
  • Contents 317
  • IX - Transylvania 401
  • Contents 401
  • X - Bosnia and the Herzegovina 427
  • Contents 427
  • Index 443
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