Revolutionary Radicalism: Its History, Purpose and Tactics with an Exposition and Discussion of the Steps Being Taken and Required to Curb It, Being the Report of the Joint Legislative Committee Investigating Seditious Activities - Vol. 3

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CHAPTER IV
Curricula Recommended for Courses of Citizenship Training

If competent, properly trained teachers have been provided, the success of courses in citizenship training will depend in large measure upon their curricula. In respect to this subject this Committee believes that, so far as possible, the courses should be standardized by the Federal Government co-operating with the various state commissioners of education. The details of the curriculum for citizenship training courses must be left largely to the state departments of education, but the Committee wishes to emphasize the importance of teaching American history, principles of government, and the duties and privileges of citizenship to children and to adult immigrants alike. In the case of children this instruction should be given during the years which come within the compulsory attendance laws so that no child can leave school without an appreciation of the American government and of its ideals and a thorough understanding of what its system is, so that he will recognize that our government is not fixed and immutable but that it may be changed and modified from time to time by constitutional amendment through the exercise of the ballot, to meet changing conditions and changing requirements.

The need for a knowledge of the English language on the part of every permanent resident in the United States is so generally conceded as to require no particular emphasis in this report.

The compulsory teaching of the standard branches of study in English is required in most states in public schools, but not always in private or parochial schools. Those states requiring instruction in the English language only in all schools, public, private and parochial, are Arkansas, California, Delaware, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Nebraska, New York, Oklahoma, and Oregon. Those states making it compulsory for public schools only are Arizona, Colorado, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Washington. The legislature of the State of Wisconsin failed to pass a bill providing that:

"All instruction in the common schools in common school subjects shall be in the English language."

In Louisiana, where a large portion of the population is French, the law provides that the general exercises in the public schools

-2346-

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Revolutionary Radicalism: Its History, Purpose and Tactics with an Exposition and Discussion of the Steps Being Taken and Required to Curb It, Being the Report of the Joint Legislative Committee Investigating Seditious Activities - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Table of Contents iii
  • Volume IV viii
  • Addendum xviii
  • List of Illustrations xxi
  • General Introduction 2011
  • Section I - Protective Governmental Measures 2015
  • Chapter I 2017
  • Chapter II 2024
  • Chapter III 2075
  • Section II - Organized Labor and Capital and Industrial Problems 2095
  • Introduction 2097
  • Chapter I 2106
  • Chapter II 2133
  • Chapter III 2148
  • Chapter IV 2151
  • Chapter V 2154
  • Chapter VI 2160
  • Chapter VII 2166
  • Chapter VIII 2174
  • Chapter IX 2180
  • Chapter X 2193
  • Chapter XI 2204
  • Chapter XII 2216
  • Chapter XIII 2226
  • Chapter XIV 2238
  • Chapter XV 2244
  • Chapter XVI 2251
  • Section III subsection I - Educational Training for Citizenship 2275
  • Introduction 2279
  • Chapter I 2293
  • Chapter II 2328
  • Chapter III - Teacher Requirements and Teacher Training 2335
  • Chapter IV - Curricula Recommended for Courses of Citizenship Training 2346
  • Chapter V - Regulated Attendance 2350
  • Chapter VI - Appropriations 2356
  • Section III subsection II 2359
  • Chapter I 2361
  • Chapter II 2366
  • Section III subsection III 2411
  • Chapter I 2417
  • Chapter II 2439
  • Chapter III 2564
  • Chapter IV 2569
  • Chapter V 2623
  • Chapter VI 2701
  • Chapter VII 2949
  • Chapter VIII 3018
  • Chapter IX 3052
  • Chapter X 3060
  • Chapter XI 3079
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