Revolutionary Radicalism: Its History, Purpose and Tactics with an Exposition and Discussion of the Steps Being Taken and Required to Curb It, Being the Report of the Joint Legislative Committee Investigating Seditious Activities - Vol. 3

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CHAPTER XI
Industries

1. NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CORPORATION SCHOOLS

In an interview with a representative of this Committee, Mr. F. C. Henderschott, managing director and treasurer of the National Association of Corporation Schools (also in charge of the educational work of the New York Edison Company) said, in substance, its follows:

" Great Britain is now organizing corporation schools, but it is the only other country that is doing anything similar.

"There is nothing in the charters of industrial corporations permitting them or demanding them to do educational work.

"Although the public schools are not adequate to meet the problem, it is not the fault of the public schools. Before they can be more adequate from the standpoint of the industries, the industries will have to be able to tell the public schools what they can do to help. It is a fine point for the corporations to try to tell the public schools what to do. The corporations will always have to do training, but the public schools should do the educating. It is only through training that you get efficiency. The corporation school movement has two functions: (1) Corrective or educational; (2) training.

"We hope to escape the first some time. Boys who leave school too soon are included in the corrective. We had twenty-eight in the New York Edison Company five years ago who could not take our post graduate work because their fundamental education was deficient. We gave them a test to determine this, and the results were almost unbelievable. This is a public service and the public demands a high grade of service; therefore, it is a necessity that we correct the fundamentals of such education. The company decided that we owed something to these twenty-eight. Now we employ grammar school graduates only. Too many employers discharge for inefficiency and that is why we have certain conditions today. You can't give an employee all he deserves in his pay envelope.

-3079-

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Revolutionary Radicalism: Its History, Purpose and Tactics with an Exposition and Discussion of the Steps Being Taken and Required to Curb It, Being the Report of the Joint Legislative Committee Investigating Seditious Activities - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Table of Contents iii
  • Volume IV viii
  • Addendum xviii
  • List of Illustrations xxi
  • General Introduction 2011
  • Section I - Protective Governmental Measures 2015
  • Chapter I 2017
  • Chapter II 2024
  • Chapter III 2075
  • Section II - Organized Labor and Capital and Industrial Problems 2095
  • Introduction 2097
  • Chapter I 2106
  • Chapter II 2133
  • Chapter III 2148
  • Chapter IV 2151
  • Chapter V 2154
  • Chapter VI 2160
  • Chapter VII 2166
  • Chapter VIII 2174
  • Chapter IX 2180
  • Chapter X 2193
  • Chapter XI 2204
  • Chapter XII 2216
  • Chapter XIII 2226
  • Chapter XIV 2238
  • Chapter XV 2244
  • Chapter XVI 2251
  • Section III subsection I - Educational Training for Citizenship 2275
  • Introduction 2279
  • Chapter I 2293
  • Chapter II 2328
  • Chapter III - Teacher Requirements and Teacher Training 2335
  • Chapter IV - Curricula Recommended for Courses of Citizenship Training 2346
  • Chapter V - Regulated Attendance 2350
  • Chapter VI - Appropriations 2356
  • Section III subsection II 2359
  • Chapter I 2361
  • Chapter II 2366
  • Section III subsection III 2411
  • Chapter I 2417
  • Chapter II 2439
  • Chapter III 2564
  • Chapter IV 2569
  • Chapter V 2623
  • Chapter VI 2701
  • Chapter VII 2949
  • Chapter VIII 3018
  • Chapter IX 3052
  • Chapter X 3060
  • Chapter XI 3079
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