Revolutionary Radicalism: Its History, Purpose and Tactics with an Exposition and Discussion of the Steps Being Taken and Required to Curb It, Being the Report of the Joint Legislative Committee Investigating Seditious Activities - Vol. 3

Go to book overview

"The corporation school has come to stay. There is no philanthropy in the decision. It is good economics. This organization has existed for seven years. We have 142 large industrial companies representing sixty-eight major lines of industry. We probably have one-half of the total wealth invested in commercial pursuits in our membership. We are conducting work of Americanization in all the corporations that have the problem. We have a citizenship program with it. We co-operate with the public schools and the Y. M. C. A. There are no representatives of the clothing industry where there are many foreigners who do not speak English.

"All this education has no effect if the wage scale is wrong. I don't think that this educational work would have any effect on people afflicted with Bolshevism, but the chances of having Bolshevism would be decreased about 90 per cent. by having education in all corporations as a preventive measure. The educational work of the United States Steel Company will win them the strike.

"Training in itself will not solve the personnel problem. It must be related to all the other personnel problems. You have got to employ scientifically. The United States Steel Company would have lost their strike hands down if they had not run their educational program from the start.

"Americanization is much talked about and little practiced. The actual developments have been weak. Personnel executives have not been trained. Industry has a cancer and is trying to cure it with a porous plaster. We expect to establish a commercial university which will train personnel executives and be a laboratory for industrial problems.


Why Business Organizations Should Be Class "A" Members of the National Association of Corporation Schools

Nation-Wide Co-operation

The National Association of Corporation Schools represents the first successful attempt at nation-wide training of the workers of the United States on the part of the business interests. Its purpose is to increase the efficiency of the industries of the United States through industrial training and to supplement with training the educational efforts of the public schools.

-3080-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Revolutionary Radicalism: Its History, Purpose and Tactics with an Exposition and Discussion of the Steps Being Taken and Required to Curb It, Being the Report of the Joint Legislative Committee Investigating Seditious Activities - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Table of Contents iii
  • Volume IV viii
  • Addendum xviii
  • List of Illustrations xxi
  • General Introduction 2011
  • Section I - Protective Governmental Measures 2015
  • Chapter I 2017
  • Chapter II 2024
  • Chapter III 2075
  • Section II - Organized Labor and Capital and Industrial Problems 2095
  • Introduction 2097
  • Chapter I 2106
  • Chapter II 2133
  • Chapter III 2148
  • Chapter IV 2151
  • Chapter V 2154
  • Chapter VI 2160
  • Chapter VII 2166
  • Chapter VIII 2174
  • Chapter IX 2180
  • Chapter X 2193
  • Chapter XI 2204
  • Chapter XII 2216
  • Chapter XIII 2226
  • Chapter XIV 2238
  • Chapter XV 2244
  • Chapter XVI 2251
  • Section III subsection I - Educational Training for Citizenship 2275
  • Introduction 2279
  • Chapter I 2293
  • Chapter II 2328
  • Chapter III - Teacher Requirements and Teacher Training 2335
  • Chapter IV - Curricula Recommended for Courses of Citizenship Training 2346
  • Chapter V - Regulated Attendance 2350
  • Chapter VI - Appropriations 2356
  • Section III subsection II 2359
  • Chapter I 2361
  • Chapter II 2366
  • Section III subsection III 2411
  • Chapter I 2417
  • Chapter II 2439
  • Chapter III 2564
  • Chapter IV 2569
  • Chapter V 2623
  • Chapter VI 2701
  • Chapter VII 2949
  • Chapter VIII 3018
  • Chapter IX 3052
  • Chapter X 3060
  • Chapter XI 3079
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 3146

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.